Hull vs Hail - What's the difference?

hull | hail |


As verbs the difference between hull and hail

is that hull is while hail is (impersonal) said of the weather when hail is falling or hail can be to greet; give salutation to; salute.

As a noun hail is

balls or pieces of ice falling as precipitation, often in connection with a thunderstorm.

As an adjective hail is

(obsolete) healthy, whole, safe.

As an interjection hail is

an exclamation of respectful or reverent salutation, or, occasionally, of familiar greeting.

hull

English

Etymology 1

(etyl) .

Noun

(en noun)
  • The outer covering of a fruit or seed
  • Synonyms
    * (outer covering of fruit or seed ): husk, shell
    Derived terms
    * ahull * monohull * multihull * twinhull * tank hull * hull-down

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To remove the outer covering of a fruit or seed.
  • She sat on the back porch hulling peanuts.
    Synonyms
    * (to remove hull of a fruit or seed ): peel, husk, shell, shuck

    Etymology 2

    Origin uncertain; perhaps the same word as Etymology 1, above.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The body or frame of a vessel such as a ship or plane
  • * Dryden
  • Deep in their hulls our deadly bullets light.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (obsolete, intransitive, nautical) To drift; to be carried by the impetus of wind or water on the ship's hull alone, with sails furled
  • *, II.1:
  • *:We goe not, but we are carried: as things that flote, now gliding gently, now hulling violently, according as the water is, either stormy or calme.
  • To hit (a ship) in the hull with cannon fire etc.
  • ----

    hail

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) haile, hail, from (etyl) ). Root-cognates outside of Germanic include (etyl) .

    Noun

    (-)
  • Balls or pieces of ice falling as precipitation, often in connection with a thunderstorm.
  • Derived terms
    * hailstone * hail storm / hailstorm * hail shaft / hailshaft

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (impersonal) Said of the weather when hail is falling.
  • They say it's going to hail tomorrow.
  • to send or release hail
  • The cloud would hail down furiously within a few minutes .

    Etymology 2

    The adjective hail is a variant of (from the early 13th century). The transitive verb with the meaning "to salute" is also from the 13th century. The cognate verb heal is already Old English (. Also cognate is whole, from Old English (the spelling with wh- is unetymological, introduced in the 15th century).

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • to greet; give salutation to; salute.
  • To name; to designate; to call.
  • * Milton
  • And such a son as all men hailed me happy.
    He was hailed as a hero.
  • to call out loudly in order to gain the attention of
  • Hail a taxi.
    Derived terms
    * hailer * hail from

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • (obsolete) Healthy, whole, safe.
  • Interjection

    (en-intj)
  • An exclamation of respectful or reverent salutation, or, occasionally, of familiar greeting.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Hail , brave friend.
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