Nag vs Hag - What's the difference?

nag | hag |


As nouns the difference between nag and hag

is that nag is a small horse; a pony or nag can be one who while hag is mind, mindset, temper, inclination.

As a verb nag

is to repeatedly remind or complain to someone in an annoying way, often about insignificant matters.

nag

English

Etymology 1

(etyl) nagge'', cognate with Dutch ''negge

Noun

(en noun)
  • A small horse; a pony.
  • An old useless horse.
  • (obsolete, derogatory) A paramour.
  • * 1598 , , III. x. 11:
  • Yon ribaudred nag of Egypt – Whom leprosy o'ertake!
    Synonyms
    * (old useless horse) dobbin, hack, jade, plug
    Coordinate terms
    * (old useless horse) bum (racing )

    Etymology 2

    Probably from a (etyl) source; compare Swedish .

    Verb

    (nagg)
  • To repeatedly remind or complain to someone in an annoying way, often about insignificant matters.
  • To act inappropriately in the eyes of peers, to backstab, to verbally abuse.
  • To bother with persistent memories.
  • The notion that he forgot something nagged him the rest of the day.
  • Other sorts of persistent annoyance, e.g.:
  • A nagging pain in his left knee
    A nagging north wind

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • One who .
  • Anagrams

    * * * * ----

    hag

    English

    Etymology 1

    (etyl) hagge, hegge 'demon, old woman', shortening of (etyl) '', ).1987, E. C. Polomé, R. Bergmann (editor), "Althochdeutsch ''hag(a)zussa'' 'Hexe': Versuch einer neuen Etymologie", ''Althochdeutsch 2 (Wörter und Namen. Forschungsgeschichte) , pages 1107-1112.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A witch, sorceress, or enchantress; a wizard.
  • * (rfdate) Golding
  • [Silenus] that old hag .
  • (pejorative) An ugly old woman.
  • A fury; a she-monster.
  • (Crashaw)
  • A hagfish; an eel-like marine marsipobranch, , allied to the lamprey, with a suctorial mouth, labial appendages, and a single pair of gill openings.
  • A hagdon or shearwater.
  • An appearance of light and fire on a horse's mane or a man's hair.
  • (Blount)
  • The fruit of the hagberry, Prunus padus .
  • Synonyms
    * (witch or sorceress) * (ugly old woman) See also * (fury or she-monster) * (eel-like marine marsipobranch) borer, hagfish, sleepmarken, slime eel, sucker * (hagdon or shearwater) * (appearance of light and fire on mane or hair) * (fruit of the hagberry)
    Derived terms
    * fag hag

    Verb

    (hagg)
  • To harass; to weary with vexation.
  • * L'Estrange
  • How are superstitious men hagged out of their wits with the fancy of omens.

    Etymology 2

    Scots ; compare English hack.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A small wood, or part of a wood or copse, which is marked off or enclosed for felling, or which has been felled.
  • * Fairfax
  • This said, he led me over hoults and hags ; / Through thorns and bushes scant my legs I drew.
  • A quagmire; mossy ground where peat or turf has been cut.
  • (Dugdale)

    References

    (Webster 1913)

    Anagrams

    * ----