Habitue vs Habitude - What's the difference?

habitue | habitude |


As a verb habitue

is .

As a noun habitude is

(archaic) the essential character of one's being or existence; native or normal constitution; mental or moral constitution; bodily condition; native temperament.

habitue

English

Alternative forms

* habitue

Noun

(en noun)
  • One who frequents a place; a denizen or regular
  • :
  • *
  • *:At half-past nine on this Saturday evening, the parlour of the Salutation Inn, High Holborn, contained most of its customary visitors.In former days every tavern of repute kept such a room for its own select circle, a club, or society, of habitu├ęs , who met every evening, for a pipe and a cheerful glass.
  • A devotee.
  • habitude

    English

    Noun

  • (archaic) The essential character of one's being or existence; native or normal constitution; mental or moral constitution; bodily condition; native temperament.
  • * 1597 , (William Shakespeare), (114)
  • His real habitude gave life and grace To appertainings and to ornament.
  • (archaic) Habitual disposition; normal or characteristic mode of behaviour, whether from habit or from nature
  • * 1683 , (John Dryden), Life of Plutarch (21)
  • An habitude of commanding his passions in order to his health.
  • * 1891 , Thomas Hardy, Tess of the d'Urbervilles
  • (obsolete) Behaviour or manner of existence in relation to something else; relation; respect.
  • * 1732 , (George Berkeley), (Alciphron) (4.21)
  • Proportion ... signifies the habitude or relation of one quantity to another.
  • (obsolete) In full habitude : fully, wholly, entirely; in all respects.
  • * 1661 , (Thomas Fuller), The History of the Worthies of England (1.165)
  • Although I believe not the report in full habitude .
  • (obsolete) habitual association; familiar relation; acquaintance; familiarity; intimacy; association; intercourse.
  • * 1665 , (John Evelyn), Memoirs (3.65)
  • The discourse of some with whom I have had some habitudes since my coming home.
  • (obsolete) an associate; an acquaintance; someone with whom one is familiar.
  • * 1676 , (George Etherege), The Man of Mode (4.1)
  • La Corneus and Sallyes were the only habitudes we had.
  • Habit; custom; usage.
  • * 1599 , (James I of England), (Basilikon Doron) (28)
  • Which ... by long habitude , are thought rather vertue than vice among them.
  • (obsolete) A chemical term used in the plural to denote the various ways in which one substance reacts with another; chemical reaction.
  • * 1818 , (Michael Faraday), Experimental Researches in Chemistry and Physics (32)
  • Most authors who have had occasion to describe naphthaline, have noticed its habitudes with sulphuric acid.

    References

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