Personality vs Habit - What's the difference?

personality | habit |


As nouns the difference between personality and habit

is that personality is a set of qualities that make a person (or thing) distinct from another while habit is habit.

personality

English

Noun

(personalities)
  • A set of qualities that make a person (or thing) distinct from another.
  • * (Samuel Taylor Coleridge)
  • Personality is individuality existing in itself, but with a nature as a ground.
  • * {{quote-book, year=1963, author=(Margery Allingham), title=(The China Governess)
  • , chapter=19 citation , passage=Meanwhile Nanny Broome was recovering from her initial panic and seemed anxious to make up for any kudos she might have lost, by exerting her personality to the utmost. She took the policeman's helmet and placed it on a chair, and unfolded his tunic to shake it and fold it up again for him.}}
  • An assumed role or manner of behavior.
  • A celebrity.
  • Charisma, or qualities that make a person stand out from the crowd.
  • * 1959 , Lloyd Price, “Personality”:
  • But over and over / I´ll be a fool for you / 'cause you got personality .
  • Something said or written which refers to the person, conduct, etc., of some individual, especially something of a disparaging or offensive nature; personal remarks.
  • *
  • Sharp personalities were exchanged.
  • * 1905 , ,
  • Perceiving that personalities were not out of order, I asked him what species of beast had long ago twisted and mutilated his left ear.
  • (legal) That quality of a law which concerns the condition, state, and capacity of persons.
  • (Burrill)

    Synonyms

    * (l)

    Derived terms

    * addictive personality * borderline personality disorder * multiple personalities * subpersonality

    References

    Anagrams

    *

    habit

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl), from (etyl) ; see have.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • An action done on a regular basis.
  • * Washington Irving
  • a man of very shy, retired habits
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-07-19, author= Ian Sample
  • , volume=189, issue=6, page=34, magazine=(The Guardian Weekly) , title= Irregular bedtimes may affect children's brains , passage=Irregular bedtimes may disrupt healthy brain development in young children, according to a study of intelligence and sleeping habits .  ¶ Going to bed at a different time each night affected girls more than boys, but both fared worse on mental tasks than children who had a set bedtime, researchers found.}}
  • An action performed repeatedly and automatically, usually without awareness.
  • A long piece of clothing worn by monks and nuns.
  • A piece of clothing worn uniformly for a specific activity.
  • (archaic) Outward appearance; attire; dress.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy.
  • * Addison
  • There are, among the statues, several of Venus, in different habits .
  • * 1719 , (Daniel Defoe), (Robinson Crusoe)
  • it was always my fate to choose for the worse, so I did here; for having money in my pocket and good clothes upon my back, I would always go on board in the habit of a gentleman; and so I neither had any business in the ship, or learned to do any.
  • (botany) form of growth or general appearance of a variety or species of plant, e.g. erect, prostrate, bushy.
  • An addiction.
  • Synonyms
    * (l)

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) habiten, from (etyl) habiter, from (etyl) ; see have.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To clothe.
  • (archaic) To inhabit.