Accustom vs Habit - What's the difference?

accustom | habit |


As nouns the difference between accustom and habit

is that accustom is (obsolete) custom while habit is habit.

As a verb accustom

is (lb) to make familiar by use; to cause to accept; to habituate, familiarize, or inure; -- with to .

accustom

English

Verb

(en verb)
  • (lb) To make familiar by use; to cause to accept; to habituate, familiarize, or inure; -- with to .
  • *ca. 1753 , (John Hawkesworth) et al., Adventurer
  • *:I shall always fear that he who accustoms himself to fraud in little things, wants only opportunity to practice it in greater.
  • *
  • *:“[…] it is not fair of you to bring against mankind double weapons ! Dangerous enough you are as woman alone, without bringing to your aid those gifts of mind suited to problems which men have been accustomed to arrogate to themselves.”
  • To be wont.
  • :(Carew)
  • To cohabit.
  • *(John Milton) (1608-1674)
  • *:We with the best men accustom openly; you with the basest commit private adulteries.
  • Synonyms

    * habituate, get used to, inure, exercise, train

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (obsolete) Custom.
  • References

    *

    habit

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl), from (etyl) ; see have.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • An action done on a regular basis.
  • * Washington Irving
  • a man of very shy, retired habits
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-07-19, author= Ian Sample
  • , volume=189, issue=6, page=34, magazine=(The Guardian Weekly) , title= Irregular bedtimes may affect children's brains , passage=Irregular bedtimes may disrupt healthy brain development in young children, according to a study of intelligence and sleeping habits .  ¶ Going to bed at a different time each night affected girls more than boys, but both fared worse on mental tasks than children who had a set bedtime, researchers found.}}
  • An action performed repeatedly and automatically, usually without awareness.
  • A long piece of clothing worn by monks and nuns.
  • A piece of clothing worn uniformly for a specific activity.
  • (archaic) Outward appearance; attire; dress.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Costly thy habit as thy purse can buy.
  • * Addison
  • There are, among the statues, several of Venus, in different habits .
  • * 1719 , (Daniel Defoe), (Robinson Crusoe)
  • it was always my fate to choose for the worse, so I did here; for having money in my pocket and good clothes upon my back, I would always go on board in the habit of a gentleman; and so I neither had any business in the ship, or learned to do any.
  • (botany) form of growth or general appearance of a variety or species of plant, e.g. erect, prostrate, bushy.
  • An addiction.
  • Synonyms
    * (l)

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) habiten, from (etyl) habiter, from (etyl) ; see have.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To clothe.
  • (archaic) To inhabit.