Grimace vs Frown - What's the difference?

grimace | frown |


As nouns the difference between grimace and frown

is that grimace is a distortion of the countenance, whether habitual, from affectation, or momentary and occasional, to express some feeling, as contempt, disapprobation, complacency, etc; a smirk; a made-up face while frown is a facial expression in which the eyebrows are brought together, and the forehead is wrinkled, usually indicating displeasure, sadness or worry, or less often confusion or concentration.

As verbs the difference between grimace and frown

is that grimace is to make grimaces; to distort one's face; to make faces while frown is to have a on one's face.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

grimace

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • A distortion of the countenance, whether habitual, from affectation, or momentary and occasional, to express some feeling, as contempt, disapprobation, complacency, etc.; a smirk; a made-up face.
  • * "I trundle off to bed, eyes brimming, face twisted into a grateful glistening grimace , and awaken the next day wondering what all the fuss was about." — Opera News , March 2005
  • Verb

    (grimac)
  • To make grimaces; to distort one's face; to make faces.
  • frown

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A facial expression in which the eyebrows are brought together, and the forehead is wrinkled, usually indicating displeasure, sadness or worry, or less often confusion or concentration.
  • Derived terms

    * permafrown

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To have a on one's face.
  • To manifest displeasure or disapprobation; to look with disfavour or threateningly.
  • Noisy gossip in the library is frowned upon.
  • * Shakespeare
  • The sky doth frown and lower upon our army.
  • To repress or repel by expressing displeasure or disapproval; to rebuke with a look.
  • Frown the impudent fellow into silence.

    Derived terms

    * frown at * frown on * frown upon