Regale vs Gregale - What's the difference?

regale | gregale |


As a verb regale

is .

As a noun gregale is

a strong mediterranean wind blowing from the north-east.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

regale

English

Etymology

From (etyl) . Influenced in Old French by se rigoler "amuse oneself, rejoice," of unknown origin.

Noun

(en noun)
  • A feast, meal.
  • Verb

    (en-verb)
  • To please or entertain (someone).
  • * 26 June 2014 , A.A Dowd, AV Club Paul Rudd and Amy Poehler spoof rom-com clichés in They Came Together [http://www.avclub.com/review/paul-rudd-and-amy-poehler-spoof-rom-com-cliches-th-206220]
  • You’ve Got Mail is certainly the basic model for the plot, which finds corporate candy shill Joel (Rudd) and indie-sweetshop owner Molly (Poehler) regaling their dinner companions with the very long, digressive story of how they met and fell in love.
  • To provide hospitality for (someone); to supply with abundant food and drink.
  • (obsolete) To feast ((on), (with) something).
  • *1723 , Charles Walker, Memoirs of Sally Salisbury , V:
  • *:she hardly lets a Week pass without making the Lady Abbess and her Nuns a Visit, to regale with a Cup of burnt Brandy.
  • (figurative) To entertain with something that delights; to gratify; to refresh.
  • to regale the taste, the eye, or the ear

    gregale

    English

    Noun

    (head)
  • a strong Mediterranean wind blowing from the north-east
  • :* 1963': The dog days have ended, the maijstral has ceased to blow. Soon the other wind called '''gregale will bring the gentle rains to solemnize the sowing of our red wheat. — Thomas Pynchon, ''V.