Goof vs Greet - What's the difference?

goof | greet |


As nouns the difference between goof and greet

is that goof is (us) a mistake or error, while greet is mourning, weeping, lamentation.

As verbs the difference between goof and greet

is that goof is (us) to make a mistake while greet is to address with salutations or expressions of kind wishes; to salute; to hail; to welcome; to accost with friendship; to pay respects or compliments to, either personally or through the intervention of another, or by writing or token or greet can be (scotland|northern england) to weep; to cry.

As an adjective greet is

(obsolete|outside|scotland) great.

goof

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • (US) A mistake or error,
  • I made a goof in that last calculation.
  • # (US, cinematography) An error made during production which finds its way into the final release.
  • (US) A foolish and/or silly person; a goofball.
  • Your little brother is a total goof .
  • A child molester.
  • Synonyms

    * (error) blooper, boo-boo, error, faux pas, fluff, gaffe, lapse, mistake, slip, stumble, thinko * See also

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (US) To make a mistake.
  • It's my fault: I goofed.
  • (US) To engage in mischief.
  • We were just goofing by painting the neighbors cat green.

    Synonyms

    * See also

    Derived terms

    (terms derived from goof) * goof around * goof off * goof-off * goof up * goofball * goofy

    greet

    English

    Etymology 1

    (etyl) . Compare Old Saxon grotian, Old Frisian greta, Old High German gruozen.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To address with salutations or expressions of kind wishes; to salute; to hail; to welcome; to accost with friendship; to pay respects or compliments to, either personally or through the intervention of another, or by writing or token.
  • * 1591 , (William Shakespeare), , Act III, scene 1
  • My lord, the mayor of London comes to greet you.
  • * 1900 , , The House Behind the Cedars , Chapter I,
  • Warwick observed, as they passed through the respectable quarter, that few people who met the girl greeted her, and that some others whom she passed at gates or doorways gave her no sign of recognition; from which he inferred that she was possibly a visitor in the town and not well acquainted.
  • To come upon, or meet, as with something that makes the heart glad.
  • * '1707, (Joseph Addison), ''Rosamond , Act I, scene 4
  • In vain the spring my senses greets .
  • To accost; to address.
  • (Alexander Pope)
  • To meet and give salutations.
  • * circa 1590 , (William Shakespeare), (Titus Adronicus), Act I, scene 2, line 90
  • There greet in silence, as the dead are wont, And sleep in peace.
  • To be perceived by (somebody).
  • *{{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-08, volume=407, issue=8839, page=52, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= The new masters and commanders , passage=From the ground, Colombo’s port does not look like much. Those entering it are greeted by wire fences, walls dating back to colonial times and security posts. For mariners leaving the port after lonely nights on the high seas, the delights of the B52 Night Club and Stallion Pub lie a stumble away.}}
    Derived terms
    * greeter * meet-and-greet

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) (m), .

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • (obsolete, outside, Scotland) Great.
  • Etymology 3

    From a blend of two (etyl) verbs, (of uncertain ultimate origin), both ‘weep, lament’.

    Verb

  • (Scotland, Northern England) To weep; to cry.
  • *1933 , (Lewis Grassic Gibbon), Cloud Howe'', Polygon 2006 (''A Scots Quair ), page 312:
  • *:And damn't! if he didn't take down her bit things and scone her so sore she grat like a bairn [...].
  • * 2008 , (James Kelman), Kieron Smith, Boy , Penguin 2009, page 2:
  • My maw went potty and started greeting .

    Noun

    (-)
  • Mourning, weeping, lamentation.
  • References

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