Cause vs Grant - What's the difference?

cause | grant | Related terms |

Cause is a related term of grant.


As a verb cause

is .

As a proper noun grant is

and a scottish clan name, from a nickname meaning "large".

cause

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • The source of, or reason for, an event or action; that which produces or effects a result.
  • Her wedding will be cause for celebration.
    They identified a burst pipe as the cause of the flooding.
  • * , chapter=5
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=He was thinking; but the glory of the song, the swell from the great organ, the clustered lights, […], the height and vastness of this noble fane, its antiquity and its strength—all these things seemed to have their part as causes of the thrilling emotion that accompanied his thoughts.}}
  • A goal, aim or principle, especially one which transcends purely selfish ends.
  • * Shakespeare
  • God befriend us, as our cause is just.
  • * Burke
  • The part they take against me is from zeal to the cause .
  • (obsolete) Sake; interest; advantage.
  • * Bible, 2 Corinthians vii. 12
  • I did it not for his cause .
  • (obsolete) Any subject of discussion or debate; a matter; an affair.
  • * Shakespeare
  • What counsel give you in this weighty cause ?
  • (legal) A suit or action in court; any legal process by which a party endeavors to obtain his claim, or what he regards as his right; case; ground of action.
  • Synonyms

    * (source or reason) reason, source

    Derived terms

    * because * causal * causality * causative * cause celebre * efficient cause * final cause * for cause (law) * formal cause * material cause

    See also

    * effect

    Verb

    (caus)
  • To set off an event or action.
  • *
  • Serene, smiling, enigmatic, she faced him with no fear whatever showing in her dark eyes.She put back a truant curl from her forehead where it had sought egress to the world, and looked him full in the face now, drawing a deep breath which caused the round of her bosom to lift the lace at her throat.
  • * {{quote-magazine, title=A better waterworks, date=2013-06-01, volume=407, issue=8838
  • , page=5 (Technology Quarterly), magazine=(The Economist) citation , passage=An artificial kidney these days still means a refrigerator-sized dialysis machine. Such devices mimic
  • To actively produce as a result, by means of force or authority.
  • * Bible, (w) vii.4
  • I will cause it to rain upon the earth forty days.
  • * , chapter=13
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=And Vickers launched forth into a tirade very different from his platform utterances. He spoke with extreme contempt of the dense stupidity exhibited on all occasions by the working classes. He said that if you wanted to do anything for them, you must rule them, not pamper them. Soft heartedness caused more harm than good.}}
  • To assign or show cause; to give a reason; to make excuse.
  • (Spenser)

    Derived terms

    * causation

    Statistics

    *

    Anagrams

    * English control verbs ----

    grant

    English

    Alternative forms

    * graunt (obsolete)

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To give over; to make conveyance of; to give the possession or title of; to convey; -- usually in answer to petition.
  • To bestow or confer, with or without compensation, particularly in answer to prayer or request; to give.
  • * 1668 July 3, , “Thomas Rue contra'' Andrew Hou?toun” in ''The Deci?ions of the Lords of Council & Se??ion I (Edinburgh, 1683), page 548:
  • He Su?pends on the?e Rea?ons, that Thomas Rue'' had granted a general Di?charge to ''Adam Mu?het'', who was his Conjunct, and ''correus debendi'', after the alleadged Service, which Di?charged ''Mu?het'', and con?equently ''Houstoun his Partner.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-05-17
  • , author=George Monbiot, authorlink=George Monbiot , title=Money just makes the rich suffer , volume=188, issue=23, page=19 , magazine=(The Guardian Weekly) citation , passage=In order to grant the rich these pleasures, the social contract is reconfigured. The welfare state is dismantled. […]}}
  • To admit as true what is not yet satisfactorily proved; to yield belief to; to allow; to yield; to concede.
  • * , Preface ("The Infidel Half Century"), section "In Quest of the First Cause":
  • The universe exists, said the father: somebody must have made it. If that somebody exists, said I, somebody must have made him. I grant that for the sake of argument, said the Oratorian.
  • To assent; to consent.
  • Noun

    (en noun)
  • The act of granting; a bestowing or conferring; concession; allowance; permission.
  • The yielding or admission of something in dispute.
  • The thing or property granted; a gift; a boon.
  • I got a grant from the government to study archeology in Egypt.''
  • (legal) A transfer of property by deed or writing; especially, an appropriation or conveyance made by the government; as, a grant of land or of money; also, the deed or writing by which the transfer is made.
  • (informal) An application for a grant (monetary boon to aid research or the like).