Grain vs Mite - What's the difference?

grain | mite |


As nouns the difference between grain and mite

is that grain is (uncountable) the harvested seeds of various grass-related food crops eg: wheat, corn, barley or grain can be a branch of a tree; a stalk or stem of a plant while mite is a minute arachnid, of the order acarina, of which there are many species; as, the cheese mite, sugar mite, harvest mite, etc see acarina.

As a verb grain

is to feed grain to.

grain

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) grain, grein, from (etyl) . Compare English corn.

Noun

  • (uncountable) The harvested seeds of various grass food crops eg: wheat, corn, barley.
  • We stored a thousand tons of grain for the winter.
  • (uncountable) Similar seeds from any food crop, eg buckwheat, amaranth, quinoa.
  • (countable) A single seed of grain.
  • a grain of wheat
  • (countable, uncountable) The crops from which grain is harvested.
  • The fields were planted with grain .
  • (uncountable) A linear texture of a material or surface.
  • Cut along the grain of the wood.
  • (countable) A single particle of a substance.
  • a grain of sand
    a grain of salt
  • (countable) A very small unit of weight, in England equal to 1/480 of an ounce troy, 0.0648 grams or, to be more exact, 64.79891 milligrams (0.002285714 avoirdupois ounce). A carat grain or pearl grain is 1/4 carat or 50 milligrams. The old French grain was 1/9216 livre or 53.11 milligrams, and in the mesures usuelles permitted from 1812 to 1839, with the livre redefined as 500 grams, it was 54.25 milligrams.
  • (countable) A former unit of gold purity, also known as carat grain , equal to "carat" (karat).
  • (materials) A region within a material having a single crystal structure or direction.
  • A reddish dye made from the coccus insect, or kermes; hence, a red color of any tint or hue, as crimson, scarlet, etc.; sometimes used by the poets as equivalent to Tyrian purple.
  • * Milton
  • all in a robe of darkest grain
  • * Quoted by Coleridge, preface to Aids to Reflection
  • doing as the dyers do, who, having first dipped their silks in colours of less value, then give them the last tincture of crimson in grain .
  • The hair side of a piece of leather, or the marking on that side.
  • (Knight)
  • (in the plural) The remains of grain, etc., after brewing or distillation; hence, any residuum. Also called
  • (botany) A rounded prominence on the back of a sepal, as in the common dock.
  • Temper; natural disposition; inclination.
  • * Hayward
  • brothers not united in grain
    Derived terms
    * against the grain * grain of salt
    See also
    * cereal

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To feed grain to.
  • To make granular; to form into grains.
  • To form grains, or to assume a granular form, as the result of crystallization; to granulate.
  • To texture a surface in imitation of the grain of a substance such as wood.
  • (tanning) To remove the hair or fat from a skin.
  • (tanning) To soften leather.
  • To yield fruit.
  • (Gower)

    Etymology 2

    See .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A branch of a tree; a stalk or stem of a plant.
  • A tine, prong, or fork.
  • # One of the branches of a valley or river.
  • # An iron fish spear or harpoon, with a number of points half-barbed inwardly.
  • #* 1770 : Served 5 lb of fish per man which was caught by striking with grains'' — journal of Stephen Forwood (gunner on ), 4 May 1770, quoted by Parkin (page 195).
  • # A blade of a sword, knife, etc.
  • (founding) A thin piece of metal, used in a mould to steady a core.
  • Anagrams

    * ----

    mite

    English

    (wikipedia mite)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A minute arachnid, of the order Acarina, of which there are many species; as, the cheese mite, sugar mite, harvest mite, etc. See Acarina.
  • A small coin formerly circulated in England, rated at about a third of a farthing.
  • *1803 , William Blake,
  • *:One mite wrung from the lab'rer's hands
  • *:Shall buy and sell the miser's lands;
  • A lepton, a small coin used in Palestine in the time of Christ.
  • A small weight; one twentieth of a grain.
  • Anything very small; a minute object; a very little quantity or particle. Sometimes used adverbially.
  • * , chapter=5
  • , title= Mr. Pratt's Patients , passage=“Well,” I says, “I cal'late a body could get used to Tophet if he stayed there long enough.” ¶ She flared up; the least mite of a slam at Doctor Wool was enough to set her going.}}
  • * 1959 , Frances Cavanah, Abe Lincoln Gets His Chance , Project Gutenberg, [http://www.gutenberg.org/files/17315/17315-8.txt]:
  • "Those trousers are a mite too big, but you'll soon grow into them."

    Synonyms

    * (small amount) see also .

    Derived terms

    * widow's mite

    Anagrams

    * * * ----