Goom vs Gook - What's the difference?

goom | gook |


As nouns the difference between goom and gook

is that goom is (now|chiefly|dialectal) a man or goom can be heed; attention; notice; care or goom can be or goom can be alcohol methylated spirits while gook is (slang|vulgar|pejorative|offensive|ethnic slur) a person from the far east, oceania or southeast asia, in particular a vietnamese, filipino, chinese, korean person or gook can be (informal) grime or mud.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

goom

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) goom, gome, from (etyl) .

Alternative forms

* gome, gom

Noun

(en noun)
  • (rfv-sense) (now, chiefly, dialectal) A man.
  • *1515 , the Scottish Field:
  • The king was glade of that golde, that the gome brought, And promised him full pertly, his part for to take, [...]
  • * {{quote-magazine
  • , date= , year=1860 , month=May , first= , last= , author=various , coauthors= , title=Reviews and Literary Notices , volume=5 , issue=31 , page= , magazine=Atlantic Monthly , publisher=Project Gutenberg , issn= citation , passage=… at it would be quite as inconvenient to explain that the termination _goom _ was a derivation from the Anglo-Saxon _guma_ as that it was a corruption of it; … }}
  • * {{quote-book
  • , year=2008 , year_published= , edition= , editor= , author=Barry J. Blake , title=All About Language: A Guide , chapter= citation , genre= , publisher=Oxford University Press , isbn=9780191622830 , page= , passage=Similarly bridegroom'' was originally ''bridegoom'', where ''goom'' meant 'man'.'' … It was changed to ''groom'', though a ''bridegroom does not normally groom the bride. }}
  • * {{quote-web
  • , date=2011-05-08 , year= , first= , last= , author=Jan Freeman , authorlink= , title=Here comes the goom , site=Boston Globle citation , archiveorg= , accessdate= , passage=Groom'' for ''bridegroom'' has been called inelegant, but it’s surely an improvement on ''goom . }}
  • (rfv-sense) (obsolete) lord; Lord; God.
  • Derived terms
    * (l)

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) gome, gome, from (etyl) gaumr, . More at (l).

    Noun

    (-)
  • (rfv-sense) Heed; attention; notice; care.
  • Etymology 3

    A dialectal variant of (m).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • * 1738 November 24, Richard Kay, Diary'':
  • November 24. This Day I've spent some Time in my Closet, have been but ill to Day of Tumour in my Goom which is this Afternoon burst.
  • * 1833 , Asa Greene, The Life and Adventures of Dr. Dodimus Duckworth , volume 2, page 5:
  • "I'm cutting the goom ," replied the student.
    "You've got the wrong tooth," roared the man.
  • * 1898 , The Outlook , page 69:
  • Oh, just put a little hunk on the ‘ goom ’ over the tooth. I s'pose it kind o' stim-a-lates it."
  • * 1907 , William Carew Hazlitt, English Proverbs and Proverbial Phrases :
  • Soon in the goom [gum], quick in the womb.
  • * 1949 , Cleone N. Collins, in an article published in Tic , the journal of the Ticonium Company:
  • "And Doc will you take a look at my ‘goom ’? I want my plates tight, so they won't drop or bob. Say Doc, will I be able to eat corn on the cob?"
  • * 1973 , Northwest dentistry , volume 52, page 94:
  • Why didn't you just pull it? My goom still has a sore where you put that needle.
  • (rfv-sense) Blunted teeth on a saw.
  • * {{quote-book
  • , year=1823 , year_published=2007 , edition=Digitized , editor= , author=Edward Moor , title=Suffolk Words and Phrases , chapter= citation , genre= , publisher=J. Loder for R. Hunter , isbn= , page=522 , passage=The portion so blunted is called the goom'''''. When the teeth are so worn down by use , as to be almost as low as those broken off, the saw requires '''''gooming . }}
  • * 1984 , The Huntington Library quarterly , volume 47, page 144:
  • Goom. In a blacksmith's bill just brought to me is this item. "A saw goom'd—6d." On enquiry he said that "the goom'' had ''riz'', and ta wanted ''goomin ."

    Etymology 4

    Noun

    (-)
  • Alcohol methylated spirits.
  • * 1988 , Ruby Langford, ?Susan Hampton, Don't Take Your Love to Town , page 106:
  • I rushed to see what was wrong and I could smell metho on his breath. 'Robbie, who gave you the goom ?'
  • * 1993 , Mudrooroo, The aboriginal protestors confront the declaration of the Australian Republic'', in ''The Mudrooroo/Müller Project: A Theatrical Casebook (ISBN 0868402370), page 107
  • THE BUREAUCRAT I didn't touch him; I didn't touch him. The goom's got him.
    BOB He doesn't drink, mate. His system's not up to it.
  • * 2000 , Herb Wharton, Unbranded (ISBN 0702244678)
  • "No, don't bother, it's only a bottle of goom ."
  • * 2007 , James Maxey, Bitterwood (ISBN 184416487X), page 181:
  • He popped the cork to unleash the powerful, musk- sharp stench of goom', a powerful alcohol distilled from wild swamp cabbage and seasoned with cayenne. The ' goom spilled all over his torso. The burning sensation wasn't unpleasant.
  • * 2009 , Chloe Hooper, Tall Man: The Death of Doomadgee (ISBN 1416594590), page 200:
  • Zillman: "And he also had some goom , didn't he?"
    Kidner: "Yeah, methylated spirits."

    References

    * ----

    gook

    English

    Etymology 1

    Use traced to U.S. Marines in Philippines in early 20th century. Dictionary.com]Pearson, Kim, "[http://kpearson.faculty.tcnj.edu/Dictionary/gook.htm Gook". Earliest recorded example is dated 1920.Seligman, Herbert J., " The Conquest of Haiti", The Nation, July 10, 1920. * Folk etymology suggests that during the Korean War, young Korean children would point at U.S. soldiers and shout ", guk) itself simply means "country". This explanation ignores the fact that there are many examples of the word's use that pre-date the Korean War.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (slang, vulgar, pejorative, offensive, ethnic slur) A person from the Far East, Oceania or Southeast Asia, in particular a Vietnamese, Filipino, Chinese, Korean person.
  • Usage notes
    * In the US, gook refers particularly to a Vietnamese person in the context of the Vietnam War, and particularly to the Viet Cong. It is generally considered highly offensive, on a par with nigger.

    Etymology 2

    Possible blend of goop and gunk.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (informal) Grime or mud.
  • * {{quote-book, 1983, Len O'Connor, A Reporter in Sweet Chicago, isbn=0809276488 citation
  • , passage="Roost No More" was a yellow gook that Joe's people would spread around, for a fee, on the ledges of houses and commercial buildings plagued by pigeons.}}
    Derived terms
    * gooky * gook up

    See also

    * gook wagon