Goofy vs Barmy - What's the difference?

goofy | barmy |


As adjectives the difference between goofy and barmy

is that goofy is silly, quirky while barmy is (rare) containing barm, ie froth from fermented yeast or barmy can be (chiefly|british) dotty, goofy, wacko.

goofy

English

Etymology 1

Adjective

(er)
  • silly, quirky
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2012 , date=December 29 , author=Paul Doyle , title=Arsenal's Theo Walcott hits hat-trick in thrilling victory over Newcastle , work=The Guardian citation , page= , passage=Glorious attacking and goofy defending: here was a match that encapsulated the madcap appeal of this season's Premier League.}}

    Derived terms

    * goofily * goofiness

    Etymology 2

    From the way the Disney character was first depicted surfing, with right foot forward. BBC Sport, "Sochi 2014: A jargon-busting guide to the halfpipe", 11 February 2014

    Adjective

    (-)
  • (snowboarding) riding with right foot forward.
  • Antonyms

    * (snowboarding) regular

    Coordinate terms

    * (snowboarding) switch

    References

    barmy

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl)

    Adjective

    (er)
  • (rare) containing barm, i.e. froth from fermented yeast
  • * Dryden
  • Barmy beer.

    Etymology 2

    Probably an alteration of

    Adjective

    (er)
  • (chiefly, British) odd, strange.
  • * 2013 , Russell Brand, Russell Brand and the GQ awards: 'It's amazing how absurd it seems''' (in ''The Guardian , 13 September 2013)[http://www.theguardian.com/culture/2013/sep/13/russell-brand-gq-awards-hugo-boss]
  • I thanked John, said the "oracle award" sounds like a made-up prize you'd give a fat kid on sports day – I should know, I used to get them – then that it's barmy that Hugo Boss can trade under the same name they flogged uniforms to the Nazis under and the ludicrous necessity for an event such as this one to banish such a lurid piece of information from our collective consciousness.
    Synonyms
    * dotty, goofy, wacko
    Derived terms
    * barmily * barminess

    Usage notes

    * in US English, balmy is usual for sense (2); elsewhere this is occasionally found but some authorities consider it erroneous, despite its probable etymology.

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