Golden vs Gooden - What's the difference?

golden | gooden |


As a proper noun golden

is .

As a verb gooden is

to make good; improve; better; perfect or gooden can be (dialectal) to perambulate, usually town to town, collecting alms, gifts, or small gratuities before christmas-time, usually on.

golden

English

Alternative forms

* goulden (obsolete)

Adjective

(en adjective)
  • Made of, or relating to, gold.
  • She wore a golden crown.
  • Having a colour or other richness suggestive of gold.
  • Under a golden sun.
  • Marked by prosperity, creativity etc.
  • The Renaissance was a golden era.
    the Golden Horseshoe
  • Advantageous or very favourable.
  • This is a golden opportunity
  • Relating to a fiftieth anniversary.
  • It's not long until our golden wedding.

    Derived terms

    * golden age * golden-ager * golden Alexanders * golden anniversary * golden aster * golden balls * golden boot * golden boy * golden brown * golden calf * golden chain * golden club * golden contact * Golden Delicious * golden eagle * goldeneye * Golden Fleece * Golden Gate Bridge * golden girl * golden glow * golden goose * golden hamster * golden handcuffs * golden handshake * golden hello * Golden Horde * Golden Horn * Golden Horseshoe * golden jubilee * golden lion tamarin * golden mean * golden nematode * golden number * golden oldie * golden opinions * golden opportunity * golden oriole * golden parachute * golden perch * golden pheasant * golden plover * golden rectangle * golden retriever * golden rice * golden robin * goldenrod * golden rule * goldenseal * golden section * golden share * golden shiner * golden shower * golden staph * Golden State * golden syrup * golden ticket * golden triangle * golden wattle * golden wedding, golden wedding anniversary * golden years * silence is golden

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To become golden (in colour).
  • To make golden or like gold.
  • * 1994 , Marion H. Hedges, Iron City :
  • It goldened', as nothing else ' goldened , the commonplace countryside.

    gooden

    English

    Etymology 1

    From . More at (l).

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To make good; improve; better; perfect.
  • *2009 , Helen Malson, Maree Burns, Critical Feminist Approaches to Eating Dis/Orders :
  • For many years we have endeavored to comprehend how a/b could transform highly intelligent and in many respects 'model' girls and women (and sometimes boys and men) into unwitting bystanders and accomplices to their own torture and impending death while remaining convinced that they are being perfected and goodened ?
  • *2010 , Richard Francis, Fruitlands: The Alcott Family and Their Search for Utopia :
  • The passive voice is all-pervasive. This is a world in which virtue is achieved by not doing things, only thus, like Jesus (Wright tells us) may we “be Goodened with Good.
  • To become good.
  • To grow; improve; prosper.
  • Derived terms
    * (l)

    Etymology 2

    Back-formation from goodening, an alteration of .

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (dialectal) To perambulate, usually town to town, collecting alms, gifts, or small gratuities before Christmas-time, usually on .
  • *1871 , Henry Martin, The history of Brighton and environs :
  • Phoebe, in support of a good old Sussex custom, regularly, on St. Thomas's Day, December 21st, went out "Goodening ," visiting well-to-do parishioners, to gossip upon the past, over hot elderberry wine and plum cake, and to receive doles, either in money or materials, [...]
  • *1910 , Peter Hampson Ditchfield, Vanishing England: the book :
  • In 1899 the oldest dame who took part in the ceremony was aged ninety-three, while in 1904 a widow "goodened " for the thirtieth year in succession.
    Synonyms
    * (l)