Mother vs God - What's the difference?

mother | god |


As a proper noun mother

is one's mother.

As a verb god is

.

mother

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) (m), from (etyl) ).

Noun

(en noun)
  • A (human) female who (a) s a child (b) gives birth to a baby (c) donates a fertilized egg or (d) donates a body cell which has resulted in a clone. Sometimes used in reference to a pregnant female, possibly as a shortened form of mother-to-be.
  • I am visiting my mother'''(a) today.'' — ''My sister-in-law has just become a '''mother'''.(b)'' — ''Nutrients and oxygen obtained by the '''mother (c) are conveyed to the fetus.
  • * 1988 , Robert Ferro, Second Son ,
  • He had something of his mother in him, but this was because he realized that in the end only her love was unconditional, and in gratitude he had emulated her.
  • * 1991 , (Susan Faludi), The Undeclared War Against American Women ,
  • The antiabortion iconography in the last decade featured the fetus but never the mother .
  • A female parent of an animal.
  • The lioness was a mother of four cubs.
  • (figuratively) A female ancestor.
  • * 1525 , ,
  • And Ada[Adam] called his wyfe Heua[Eve] because she was the mother of all that lyveth
  • * 1844 , , Fragment on the Church , Volume 1, page 17,
  • But one in the place of God and not God, is as it were a falsehood; it is the mother falsehood from which all idolatry is derived.
  • (figuratively) A source or origin.
  • The Mediterranean was mother to many cultures and languages.
  • * 1606', '', Act 4, Scene 3, '''1866 , George Steevens (editor), ''The Complete Works of William Shakespeare , page 278,
  • Alas, poor country: / Almost afraid to know itself! It cannot / Be call'd our mother , but our grave:
  • * 1844 , , Fragment on the Church , Volume 1, page 17,
  • But one in the place of God and not God, is as it were a falsehood; it is the mother falsehood from which all idolatry is derived.
  • (when followed by a surname) A title of respect for one's mother-in-law.
  • Mother Smith, meet my cousin, Doug Jones.
  • (figuratively) Any elderly woman, especially within a particular community.
  • (figuratively) Any person or entity which performs mothering.
  • * The inhabitants of the villages ceased, they ceased in Israel, until that I Deborah arose, that I arose a mother in Israel. –Judges 5:7, KJV.
  • * Jerusalem which is above is free, which is the mother of us all. –Galatians 4:26, KJV.
  • A film or membrane which is developed on the surface of fermented alcoholic liquids, such as vinegar, wine, etc., and acts as a means of conveying the oxygen of the air to the alcohol and other combustible principles of the liquid, thus leading to their oxidation.
  • The principal piece of an astrolabe, into which the others are fixed.
  • The female superior or head of a religious house; an abbess, etc.
  • (obsolete) Hysterical passion; hysteria.
  • (Shakespeare)
    Synonyms
    * See also * metro-
    Antonyms
    * (with regards to gender) father * (with regards to ancestry) daughter, son, child
    Hypernyms
    * (a female parent) parent
    Coordinate terms
    * (a female parent) father
    Derived terms
    * antimother * be mother * biological mother * birth mother * foster mother * grandmother, great-grandmother * Mother City * Mother Earth * motherfucker * Mothering Sunday * mother-in-law * motherland * motherload * mother lode * Mother's Day * mother-to-be * mother wit * motherwort * refrigerator mother * stepmother * surrogate mother

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To treat as a mother would be expected to treat her child; to nurture.
  • *
  • She had seen fewer years than any of us, but she was of such superb Evehood and simplicity that she mothered us from the beginning.

    References

    * American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language Fourth Edition, Houghton Mifflin Company 2003.

    Etymology 2

    Calque of Arabic .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Something that is the greatest or most significant of its kind.
  • "The great duel, the mother of all battles has begun." — (Saddam Hussein)

    Etymology 3

    Shortened from (motherfucker)

    Alternative forms

    * mutha

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (euphemistic, coarse, slang) Motherfucker.
  • (euphemistic, colloquial) A striking example.
  • *
  • *
  • *
  • *
  • Synonyms
    * MF, mofo, motherfucker, mutha

    Statistics

    *

    Etymology 4

    Coined from .

    Alternative forms

    * moth-er

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (nonstandard) A cat that catches moths.
  • Usage notes
    Because of the spelling (mother), the alternative hyphenated spelling (moth-er) may be used to avoid ambiguity. 100 English basic words 1000 English basic words

    god

    English

    Noun

    (wikipedia god) (en noun)
  • A deity.
  • # A supernatural, typically immortal being with superior powers.
  • # A male deity.
  • #* 2002 , Chuck Palahniuk, Lullaby :
  • When ancient Greeks had a thought, it occurred to them as a god or goddess giving an order. Apollo was telling them to be brave. Athena was telling them to fall in love.
  • # A supreme being; God.
  • The most frequently used name for the Islamic god is Allah.
  • An idol.
  • # A representation of a deity, especially a statue or statuette.
  • # Something or someone particularly revered, worshipped, idealized, admired and/or followed.
  • #* Bible, Phil. iii. 19
  • whose god is their belly
  • (metaphor) A person in a high position of authority; a powerful ruler or tyrant.
  • An exceedingly handsome man.
  • Lounging on the beach were several Greek gods .
  • * Wilfred Owen, Disabled (poem)
  • Someone had said he'd look a god in kilts.
  • (Internet) The person who owns and runs a multi-user dungeon.
  • * 1996 , Andy Eddy, Internet after hours
  • The gods usually have several wizards, or "immortals," to assist them in building the MUD.
  • * 2003 , David Lojek, Emote to the Max (page 11)
  • The wizzes are only the junior grade of the MUD illuminati. The people who attain the senior grade of MUD freemasonry by starting their own MUD, with all due hubris, are known as gods .

    Usage notes

    The word god is often applied both to males and to females. The word was originally neuter in Proto-Germanic; monotheistic – notably Judeo-Christian – usage completely shifted the gender to masculine, necessitating the development of a feminine form, goddess.

    Synonyms

    * (supernatural being with superior powers) deity, See also

    Derived terms

    (terms derived from "god") * demigod * God * god-awful * god-child, godchild * goddam, goddamn * goddaughter * Goddess * goddess * godded * godding * godfather * god-fearing * god forbid * god-forsaken, godforsaken * God-given * godhead * godhood * god-king, god king * godless * godlike * godliness * godling * godly * godmother * God of the gaps * godparent * godsend * godship * godson * Godspeed * godward * household god * ungodly

    Proper noun

    (en-proper-noun)
  • * 1530 , , An aun?were vnto Syr Thomas Mores Dialogue'' in ''The whole workes of W. Tyndall, Iohn Frith, and Doct. Barnes, three worthy Martyrs, and principall teachers of this Churche of England, collected and compiled in one Tome togither, beyng before ?cattered, & now in Print here exhibited to the Church (1573), page 271/2:
  • * 1900 , , "The Happy Man" in The Wild Knight and Other Poems :
  • Golgotha's ghastly trinity—
    Three persons and one god .

    Verb

    (godd)
  • To idolize.
  • * {{quote-book, 1608, (William Shakespeare), , section=Act V Scene III,
  • , passage=CORIOLANUS: This last old man, / Whom with a crack'd heart I have sent to Rome, / Loved me above the measure of a father; / Nay, godded me, indeed.}}
  • * a . 1866 , (Edward Bulwer Lytton), "Death and Sisyphus".
  • To men the first necessity is gods; / And if the gods were not, / " Man would invent them, tho' they godded stones.
  • * 2001 , Conrad C. Fink, Sportswriting: The Lively Game , page 78
  • "Godded him up" ... It's the fear of discerning journalists: Does coverage of athletic stars, on field and off, approach beatification of the living?
  • to deify
  • * 1595 , (Edmund Spenser), Colin Clouts Come Home Againe .
  • Then got he bow and fhafts of gold and lead, / In which fo fell and puiflant he grew, / That Jove himfelfe his powre began to dread, / And, taking up to heaven, him godded new.
  • * 1951 , (Eric Voegelin), Dante Germino ed., The New Science of Politics: An Introduction (1987), page 125
  • The superman marks the end of a road on which we find such figures as the "godded man" of English Reformation mystics
  • * 1956 , , Fritz Eichenberg, , page 241
  • "She is so lately godded that she is still a rather poor goddess, Stranger.

    See also

    * agnosticism * apatheism * atheism * deism * divine * henotheism * kathenotheism * gnosticism * monolatrism * monotheism * pandeism * pantheism * polytheism * Tetragrammaton * theism

    References

    *

    Anagrams

    * (l), (l) 1000 English basic words ----