Essence vs Glow - What's the difference?

essence | glow |


As nouns the difference between essence and glow

is that essence is (senseid)the inherent nature of a thing or idea while glow is the state of a glowing object.

As a verb glow is

to give off light from heat or to emit light as if heated.

essence

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • (senseid)The inherent nature of a thing or idea.
  • * Landor
  • The laws are at present, both in form and essence , the greatest curse that society labours under.
  • * Addison
  • Gifts and alms are the expressions, not the essence of this virtue [charity].
  • * Courthorpe
  • The essence of Addison's humour is irony.
  • (philosophy) The true nature of anything, not accidental or illusory.
  • Constituent substance.
  • * Milton
  • Uncompounded is their essence pure.
  • A being; especially, a purely spiritual being.
  • * Milton
  • As far as gods and heavenly essences / Can perish.
  • * Washington Irving
  • He had been indulging in fanciful speculations on spiritual essences , until he had an ideal world of his own around him.
  • A significant feature of something.
  • The concentrated form of a plant or drug obtained through a distillation process.
  • * essence of Jojoba
  • Fragrance, a perfume.
  • * Alexander Pope
  • Nor let the essences exhale.

    Derived terms

    * in essence * of the essence; time is of the essence

    Anagrams

    * ----

    glow

    English

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To give off light from heat or to emit light as if heated.
  • To radiate some emotional quality like light.
  • * Dryden
  • With pride it mounts, and with revenge it glows .
  • * Alexander Pope
  • Burns with one love, with one resentment glows .
  • To gaze especially passionately at something.
  • To radiate thermal heat.
  • To shine brightly and steadily.
  • * , chapter=5
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=Here, in the transept and choir, where the service was being held, one was conscious every moment of an increasing brightness; colours glowing vividly beneath the circular chandeliers, and the rows of small lights on the choristers' desks flashed and sparkled in front of the boys' faces, deep linen collars, and red neckbands.}}
  • To make hot; to flush.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Fans, whose wind did seem / To glow the delicate cheeks which they did cool.
  • To feel hot; to have a burning sensation, as of the skin, from friction, exercise, etc.; to burn.
  • * Addison
  • Did not his temples glow / In the same sultry winds and scorching heats?
  • * John Gay
  • The cord slides swiftly through his glowing hands.

    Noun

    (-)
  • The state of a glowing object.
  • * 1994 , (Stephen Fry), (The Hippopotamus) Chapter 2
  • The door of the twins' room opposite was open; a twenty-watt night-light threw a weak yellow glow into the passageway. David could hear the twins breathing in time with each other.
  • The condition of being passionate or having warm feelings.
  • The brilliance or warmth of color in an environment or on a person (especially one's face).
  • He had a bright red glow on his face.

    Anagrams

    *