Glimpsed vs Looked - What's the difference?

glimpsed | looked |


As verbs the difference between glimpsed and looked

is that glimpsed is (glimpse) while looked is (look).

glimpsed

English

Verb

(head)
  • (glimpse)

  • glimpse

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A brief look, glance, or peek.
  • :
  • *(Samuel Rogers) (1763-1855)
  • *:Here hid by shrub wood, there by glimpses seen.
  • *
  • *:Selwyn, sitting up rumpled and cross-legged on the floor, after having boloed Drina to everybody's exquisite satisfaction, looked around at the sudden rustle of skirts to catch a glimpse of a vanishing figure—a glimmer of ruddy hair and the white curve of a youthful face, half-buried in a muff.
  • A sudden flash.
  • *(John Milton) (1608-1674)
  • *:Light as the lightning glimpse they ran.
  • A faint idea; an inkling.
  • Verb

    (glimps)
  • To see or view briefly or incompletely.
  • I have only begun to glimpse the magnitude of the problem.
  • To appear by glimpses.
  • (Drayton)

    Synonyms

    * perceive, notice, detect, spot, catch sight of

    looked

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (look)
  • Statistics

    *

    look

    English

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To try to see, to pay attention to with one’s eyes.
  • :
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=5 , passage=Then came a maid with hand-bag and shawls, and after her a tall young lady.
  • *, chapter=10
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=He looked round the poor room, at the distempered walls, and the bad engravings in meretricious frames, the crinkly paper and wax flowers on the chiffonier; and he thought of a room like Father Bryan's, with panelling, with cut glass, with tulips in silver pots, such a room as he had hoped to have for his own.}}
  • To appear, to seem.
  • :
  • *170? , (Joseph Addison), Remarks on Several Parts of Italy, &c. , Dedication
  • *:but should I publish any favours done me by your Lordship, I am afraid it would look more like vanity than gratitude.
  • *
  • *:So this was my future home, I thought!Backed by towering hills, the but faintly discernible purple line of the French boundary off to the southwest, a sky of palest Gobelin flecked with fat, fleecy little clouds, it in truth looked a dear little city; the city of one's dreams.
  • *{{quote-book, year=1963, author=(Margery Allingham), title=(The China Governess)
  • , chapter=2 citation , passage=Now that she had rested and had fed from the luncheon tray Mrs. Broome had just removed, she had reverted to her normal gaiety.  She looked cool in a grey tailored cotton dress with a terracotta scarf and shoes and her hair a black silk helmet.}}
  • *2012 , Chelsea 6-0 Wolves
  • *:Chelsea's youngsters, who looked lively throughout, then combined for the second goal in the seventh minute. Romeu's shot was saved by Wolves goalkeeper Dorus De Vries but Piazon kept the ball alive and turned it back for an unmarked Bertrand to blast home.
  • (lb) To give an appearance of being.
  • :
  • To search for, to try to find.
  • To face or present a view.
  • :
  • *Bible, (w) xi. 1
  • *:the east gatewhich looketh eastward
  • To expect or anticipate.
  • :
  • *(Edmund Spenser) (c.1552–1599)
  • *:looking each hour into death's mouth to fall
  • (lb) To express or manifest by a look.
  • *(Lord Byron) (1788-1824)
  • *:Soft eyes looked love to eyes which spake again.
  • *
  • To make sure of, to see to.
  • *1898 , (Homer), (Samuel Butler) (translator),
  • *:"Look to it yourself, father," answered Telemachus, "for they say you are the wisest counsellor in the world, and that there is no other mortal man who can compare with you.
  • To show oneself in looking.
  • :
  • *(William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • *:My toes look through the overleather.
  • To look at; to turn the eyes toward.
  • *
  • *:Serene, smiling, enigmatic, she faced him with no fear whatever showing in her dark eyes..
  • To seek; to search for.
  • *(Edmund Spenser) (c.1552–1599)
  • *:Looking my love, I go from place to place.
  • To expect.
  • :(Shakespeare)
  • To influence, overawe, or subdue by looks or presence.
  • :
  • *(John Dryden) (1631-1700)
  • *:A spirit fit to start into an empire, / And look the world to law.
  • (senseid)(lb) To look at a pitch as a batter without swinging at it.
  • :
  • :
  • :
  • Hyponyms

    * stare * gaze

    Derived terms

    * look about * look after * look around * look at * look away * look back * look down on * look down upon * look for * look forward * look forward to * look in on * look into * look on * look out * look out for * look over * look through * look to * look up * look up to * look upon * forelook * lookalike, look-alike * look alive * lookee * looker * lookit * look lively * lookout, look-out * look-see * look before you leap * look down one's nose * look daggers at * look here * look oneself * look sharp * look somebody in the eye * look the other way * look what the cat's brought in * mislook * onlooker * overlook * relook * underlook

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The action of looking, an attempt to see.
  • (label) Physical appearance, visual impression.
  • *
  • A facial expression.
  • Derived terms

    * have a look * if looks could kill * lookist * outlook * relook

    Statistics

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