Gladded vs Gladder - What's the difference?

gladded | gladder |


As verbs the difference between gladded and gladder

is that gladded is (glad) while gladder is to make glad; rejoice.

As an adjective gladder is

(glad).

As a noun gladder is

one who makes glad or gives joy.

gladded

English

Verb

(head)
  • (glad)

  • glad

    English

    Adjective

    (en-adj)
  • Pleased, happy, gratified.
  • :
  • *(Bible), (w) x.1:
  • *:A wise son maketh a glad father.
  • *(William Shakespeare) (c.1564–1616)
  • *:Glad am I that your highness is so armed.
  • *
  • *:"I was dragged up at the workhouse school till I was twelve. Then I ran away and sold papers in the streets, and anything else that I could pick up a few coppers by—except steal. I never did that. I always made up my mind I'd be a big man some day, and—I'm glad I didn't steal."
  • (lb) Having a bright or cheerful appearance; expressing or exciting joy; producing gladness.
  • *Sir (Philip Sidney) (1554-1586)
  • *:Her conversation / More glad to me than to a miser money is.
  • *(John Milton) (1608-1674)
  • *:Glad' evening and ' glad morn crowned the fourth day.
  • Usage notes

    The comparative "gladder" and superlative "gladdest" are not incorrect but may be unfamiliar enough to be taken as such. In both American and British English, the forms "more" and "most glad" are equally common in print and more common in daily speech.

    Antonyms

    * sorrowful * sad * downcast * peevish * cranky * heavy * depressed

    Derived terms

    * engladden * gladden * gladly

    Verb

    (gladd)
  • To make glad; to cheer; to gladden; to exhilarate.
  • * Dryden
  • that which gladded all the warrior train
  • * Alexander Pope
  • Each drinks the juice that glads the heart of man.
  • * 1922 , , Epithalamium , line 3
  • God that glads the lover's heart

    Statistics

    * 1000 English basic words ----

    gladder

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) gladere, from (etyl) . More at (l).

    Adjective

    (head)
  • (glad)
  • Etymology 2

    From (etyl) glader, from (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • One who makes glad or gives joy.
  • (Chaucer)

    Etymology 3

    From .

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To make glad; rejoice.
  • *1870 , Edward Royall Tyler, William Lathrop Kingsley, George Park Fisher, New Englander and Yale review :
  • [...] and, the crown and seal of nil, the reciprocated love of God in Christ — devotion to Him in service, trust, and love, with the fullness of His favor streaming back into all the currents of experience, gladdering and perfecting all.
  • *1909 , Country Correspondence, Political Department, 1800-[1804]:
  • Under the auspicious influence of the Company's just and equitable administration, the face of this province is gladdered [Sic-]—the blossoms of Peace are blowing and the blessings of tranquility increasing daily [...]
  • *2006 , P?rana Si?gha, S?hitya Ak?dem?, The knock at midnight :
  • The light of snow has gladdered the heart [...]
    (Webster 1913)