Gird vs Girth - What's the difference?

gird | girth |


As verbs the difference between gird and girth

is that gird is to bind with a flexible rope or cord or gird can be to jeer at while girth is to bind as if with a girth or band.

As nouns the difference between gird and girth

is that gird is a sarcastic remark while girth is the distance measured around an object.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

gird

English

Etymology 1

(etyl) .

Verb

  • To bind with a flexible rope or cord.
  • The fasces were girt about with twine in bundles large.
  • To encircle with, or as if with a belt.
  • The lady girt herself with silver chain, from which she hung a golden shear.
    Our home is girt by sea... -
  • To prepare oneself for an action.
  • Etymology 2

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A sarcastic remark.
  • * Shakespeare
  • I thank thee for that gird , good Tranio.
  • A stroke with a rod or switch.
  • A severe spasm; a twinge; a pang.
  • * Tillotson
  • Conscience is freed from many fearful girds and twinges which the atheist feels.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To jeer at.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Being moved, he will not spare to gird the gods.
  • To jeer.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Men of all sorts take a pride to gird at me.

    girth

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The distance measured around an object.
  • A band passed under the belly of an animal to hold various types of saddles in place.
  • * '>citation
  • The part of an animal around which the girth fits.
  • (informal) One's waistline circumference, most often a large one.
  • * Addison
  • He's a lusty, jolly fellow, that lives well, at least three yards in the girth .
  • A small horizontal brace or girder.
  • Synonyms

    * circumference * cinch

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To bind as if with a girth or band.
  • (Johnson)

    Anagrams

    * (l), (l)