Rafter vs Girt - What's the difference?

rafter | girt |


As nouns the difference between rafter and girt

is that rafter is one of a series of sloped beams that extend from the ridge or hip to the downslope perimeter or eave, designed to support the roof deck and its associated loads or rafter can be a raftsman while girt is a horizontal structural member of post and beam architecture, typically attached to bridge two or more vertical members such as corner posts.

As verbs the difference between rafter and girt

is that rafter is to make (timber, etc) into rafters while girt is to gird or girt can be (gird).

As an adjective girt is

(nautical) bound by a cable; used of a vessel so moored by two anchors that she swings against one of the cables by force of the current or tide.

rafter

English

Etymology 1

Old English . Cognate with "raft".

Noun

(en noun)
  • One of a series of sloped beams that extend from the ridge or hip to the downslope perimeter or eave, designed to support the roof deck and its associated loads.
  • *
  • the pigeons fluttered up to the rafters ,
  • flock of turkeys
  • References

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To make (timber, etc.) into rafters.
  • To furnish (a building) with rafters.
  • (UK, agriculture) To plough so as to turn the grass side of each furrow upon an unploughed ridge; to ridge.
  • (Webster 1913)

    Etymology 2

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A raftsman.
  • Anagrams

    *

    girt

    English

    Etymology 1

    Alteration of

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A horizontal structural member of post and beam architecture, typically attached to bridge two or more vertical members such as corner posts.
  • *
  • Etymology 2

    From (etyl)

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To gird.
  • To bind horizontally, as with a belt or girdle.
  • To measure the girth of.
  • Etymology 3

    See gird

    Verb

    (head)
  • (gird)
  • Adjective

    (-)
  • (nautical) Bound by a cable; used of a vessel so moored by two anchors that she swings against one of the cables by force of the current or tide.
  • Anagrams

    * *