Cart vs Gig - What's the difference?

cart | gig |


As nouns the difference between cart and gig

is that cart is to split, kill, put (to death) while gig is gig (performing engagement by a musical group, usually used when referring to events with small audience and contemporary music such as rock or punk).

cart

English

(wikipedia cart)

Etymology 1

Probably from Old English .

Noun

(en noun)
  • A small, open, wheeled vehicle, drawn or pushed by a person or animal, more often used for transporting goods than passengers.
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=5 , passage=We made an odd party before the arrival of the Ten, particularly when the Celebrity dropped in for lunch or dinner. He could not be induced to remain permanently at Mohair because Miss Trevor was at Asquith, but he appropriated a Hempstead cart from the Mohair stables and made the trip sometimes twice in a day.}}
  • A small motor vehicle resembling a car; a go-cart.
  • Derived terms
    * cartwheel * dogcart * go-cart * golf cart * luggage cart * oxcart * pushcart * put the cart before the horse * shopping cart

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To carry goods.
  • I've been carting these things around all day .
  • To carry or convey in a cart.
  • (obsolete) To expose in a cart by way of punishment.
  • * Prior
  • She chuckled when a bawd was carted .

    References

    Etymology 2

    Shortened from (cartridge).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (video games, informal) A cartridge for a video game system.
  • My ''Final Fantasy'' cart on the NES is still alive and kicking.

    Anagrams

    * *

    gig

    English

    Etymology 1

    Akin to Old Norse .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (informal, music) A performing engagement by a musical group; or, generally, any job or role for a musician or performer.
  • I caught one of the Rolling Stones' first gigs in Richmond .
    Hey, when are we gonna get that hotel gig again?
    Our guitar player had another gig so we had to get a sub.
  • (informal, by extension) Any job; especially one that is temporary; or alternately, one that is very desirable.
  • I had this gig as a file clerk but it wasn't my style so I left .
    Hey, that guy's got a great gig over at the bike shop. He hardly works all day!
  • A two-wheeled horse-drawn carriage.
  • * 1967 , William Styron, The Confessions of Nat Turner , Vintage 2004, p. 77:
  • the room grew stifling warm and vapor clung to the windowpanes, blurring the throng of people still milling outside the courthouse, a row of tethered gigs and buggies, distant pine trees in a scrawny, ragged grove.
  • (archaic) A forked spear for catching fish, frogs, or other small animals.
  • (South England) A six-oared sea rowing boat commonly found in Cornwall and the Isles of Scilly.
  • (US, military) A demerit received for some infraction of military dress or deportment codes.
  • I received gigs for having buttons undone.

    Verb

  • To fish or catch with a gig, or fish spear.
  • To engage in musical performances.
  • The Stones were gigging around Richmond at the time
  • To make fun of; to make a joke at someone's expense, often condescending.
  • His older cousin was just gigging him about being in love with that girl from school.
  • (US, military) To impose a demerit for an infraction of a dress or deportment code.
  • His sergeant gigged him for an unmade bunk.

    Etymology 2

    A shortening of (gigabyte).

    Noun

    (en-noun)
  • (colloquial, computing) A gigabyte.
  • This picture is almost a gig ; don't you wanna resize it?
    How much music does it hold?'' ''A hundred and twenty gigs .

    Etymology 3

    (etyl) gigge.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A playful or wanton girl; a giglot.
  • Etymology 4

    Probably from (etyl) (lena) .

    Verb

  • To engender.
  • (Dryden)
    (Webster 1913)