Getup vs Arise - What's the difference?

getup | arise |


As a noun getup

is (chiefly|us|informal) a costume or outfit, especially one that is ostentatious or otherwise unusual.

As a verb arise is

to come up from a lower to a higher position.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

getup

English

Alternative forms

* get up * get-up

Noun

(en noun)
  • (chiefly, US, informal) A costume or outfit, especially one that is ostentatious or otherwise unusual.
  • *1899 ,
  • When near the buildings I met a white man, in such an unexpected elegance of get–up that in the first moment I took him for a sort of vision.
  • * 1917 , " 1,200 Reading Firemen March," Reading Eagle (Pennsylvania, USA), 28 Oct. p. 4:
  • The Schnitzelbank Band, each member attired in an odd getup , received many comments for the manner in which the men marched.
  • * 2009 , " Worried They Will Miss the War: Inside the Mind of West Point's Class of 2009," Newsweek , 6 June:
  • [A] parade of costumed cadets trots by: a shark costume, an Uncle Sam getup and three young men in form-fitting bodysuits.
  • (informal) A fight or altercation.
  • * 2002 , Andrea Sachs, " Caricature Builder," Time , 21 Jan.:
  • "A bully. Picked on fellows. He loved to fight. But I never saw him in a getup with a fellow his own size."
  • (publishing) Layout and production style, as of a magazine.
  • See also

    * all get up * get up

    arise

    English

    Alternative forms

    * arize (obsolete)

    Verb

  • To come up from a lower to a higher position.
  • to arise from a kneeling posture
    A cloud arose and covered the sun.
  • To come up from one's bed or place of repose; to get up.
  • He arose early in the morning.
  • To spring up; to come into action, being, or notice; to become operative, sensible, or visible; to begin to act a part; to present itself.
  • * Bible, Exodus i. 8
  • There arose up a new king which knew not Joseph.
  • * Milton
  • the doubts that in his heart arose
  • * 1961 , J. A. Philip, "Mimesis in the Sophistês'' of Plato," ''Transactions and Proceedings of the American Philological Association , vol. 92, p. 454,
  • Because Plato allowed them to co-exist, the meaning and connotations of the one overlap those of the other, and ambiguities arise .

    Synonyms

    * emerge * occur * appear * * (idiomatic) pop up * (resume existing) reappear

    References

    * *