Gesture vs Gesticulate - What's the difference?

gesture | gesticulate | Related terms |

Gesticulate is a related term of gesture.


As verbs the difference between gesture and gesticulate

is that gesture is to make a gesture or gestures while gesticulate is to make gestures or motions, as in speaking; to use postures.

As a noun gesture

is a motion of the limbs or body, especially one made to emphasize speech.

gesture

Noun

(en noun)
  • A motion of the limbs or body, especially one made to emphasize speech.
  • The middle-finger gesture is really a nonverbal swear.
    This Web browser can be controlled with mouse gestures .
  • * Milton
  • Grace was in all her steps, heaven in her eye, / In every gesture dignity and love.
  • An act or a remark made as a formality or as a sign of attitude.
  • We took flowers as a gesture of sympathy.
  • * '>citation
  • (obsolete) The manner of carrying the body; position of the body or limbs; posture.
  • * Sir Thomas Browne
  • Accubation, or lying down at meals, was a gesture used by many nations.

    Verb

  • To make a gesture or gestures.
  • My dad said to never gesture with my hands when I talk.
    Never gesture at someone with a middle finger.
  • To express something by a gesture or gestures.
  • He gestured his disgust.
  • To accompany or illustrate with gesture or action.
  • * Hooker
  • It is not orderly read, nor gestured as beseemeth.

    Synonyms

    * gesticulate

    Hyponyms

    * beckon

    See also

    *

    gesticulate

    English

    Verb

    (gesticulat)
  • To make gestures or motions, as in speaking; to use postures.
  • To say or express through gestures.
  • * "...the TV programme Friends is influencing not only the way Irish people speak but also how they gesticulate . Now almost every utterance is accompanied by arms outstretched and palms turned upwards." Irish Times , December 6, 2004