Veer vs Geer - What's the difference?

veer | geer |


As nouns the difference between veer and geer

is that veer is a turn or swerve; an instance of veering while geer is .

As a verb veer

is (obsolete|nautical) to let out (a sail-line), to allow (a sheet) to run out or veer can be to change direction or course suddenly; to swerve.

veer

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) .

Verb

(en verb)
  • (obsolete, nautical) To let out (a sail-line), to allow (a sheet) to run out.
  • *1596 , (Edmund Spenser), The Faerie Queene , volume 12:
  • *:As when a skilfull Marriner doth reed / A storme approching, that doth perill threat, / He will not bide the daunger of such dread, / But strikes his sayles, and vereth his mainsheat, / And lends vnto it leaue the emptie ayre to beat.
  • Etymology 2

    From (etyl) virer.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A turn or swerve; an instance of veering.
  • Verb

    (en verb)
  • To change direction or course suddenly; to swerve.
  • The car slid on the ice and veered out of control.
  • * (rfdate), Dryden:
  • And as he leads, the following navy veers .
  • * (rfdate), Burke:
  • An ordinary community which is hostile or friendly as passion or as interest may veer about.
  • * {{quote-news, year=2012, date=November 7, author=Matt Bai, title=Winning a Second Term, Obama Will Confront Familiar Headwinds, work=New York Times citation
  • , passage=At this time in 2008, even as the global economy veered toward collapse, optimism about Washington ran surprisingly high.}}
  • (of the wind) To shift in a clockwise direction (if in the Northern Hemisphere, or in a counterclockwise direction if in the Southern Hemisphere).Bowditch 2002
  • (intransitive, nautical, of the wind) To shift aft.
  • (nautical) To change direction into the wind; to ship.
  • To turn.
  • Antonyms
    * back * haul forward

    References

    Anagrams

    * ----

    geer

    English

    Noun

  • ----