Vee vs Gee - What's the difference?

vee | gee |


As nouns the difference between vee and gee

is that vee is while gee is a gee-gee; a horse or gee can be or gee can be (ireland|slang) (vagina), (vulva)[http://booksgooglecom/books?id=4yfseghljboc&pg=pa850&lpg=pa850&dq=gee+%22om+dalzell%22+%22terry+victor%22&source=bl&ots=7jrck2k_5c&sig=gvq1g1ffirwftymi7wgybhf0304&hl=en&sa=x&ei=tddat5pc5jsjatgoljml&ved=0ccaq6aewaa#v=onepage&q&f=false the new partridge dictionary of slang and unconventional english ] p 850, tom dalzell and terry victor routledge, 2006 isbn: 0-415-25937-1.

As an interjection gee is

a general exclamation of surprise or frustration.

As a verb gee is

(often as imperative to a draft animal) to turn in a direction away from the driver, typically to the right.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

vee

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • Something with the shape of the letter V. Found in compounds such as vee-necked.
  • Migrating geese fly in a vee.
  • (cricket) The arc of the field, forward of the batsman, from cover to midwicket, in which drives are played
  • See also

    *

    Derived terms

    * teevee * veep

    Anagrams

    * * ----

    gee

    English

    Etymology 1

    A shortening of (Jesus), perhaps as in the oath (by Jesus)

    Interjection

    (en interjection)
  • A general exclamation of surprise or frustration.
  • Gee , I didn't know that!
    Gee , this is swell fun!
    Usage notes
    Gee'' is generally considered somewhat dated or juvenile. It is often used for ironic effect, with the speaker putting on the persona of a freshly-scrubbed freckle-faced kid from days gone by (e.g. 1950 sitcom children, such as Beaver on ).
    Synonyms
    * (exclamation of surprise) geez, gosh, golly
    Derived terms
    * gee whiz * gee whillikers, gee willikers, gee willickers

    Etymology 2

    Verb

  • (often as imperative to a draft animal) To turn in a direction away from the driver, typically to the right.
  • This horse won't gee when I tell him to.
    You may need to walk up to the front of the pack and physically gee the lead dog.
    Mush, huskies. Now, gee'''! ' Gee !
  • (UK, dialect, obsolete) To agree; to harmonize.
  • (Forby)
    Derived terms
    * gee haw whimmy diddle
    Coordinate terms
    * haw

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A gee-gee; a horse.
  • * 1879 , , Act I:
  • *:You'll say a better Major-General has never sat a gee .
  • Etymology 3

    Pronunciation of the letter (G).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • One branch of English society drops its initial aitches, and another branch ignores its terminal gees .
  • (slang) ; a thousand dollars.
  • ten gees
  • (physics) ; the unit of acceleration equal to that exerted by gravity at the earth's surface.
  • * {{quote-magazine
  • , year = 1949 , month = July , first = Margaret , last = St. Clair , authorlink = Margaret St. Clair , title = Sacred Martian Pig , magazine = Startling Stories , page = 92 , passage = I've more muscle than you, and I'm used to greater gee , being from earth. }}
  • * {{quote-book
  • , year = 1987 , first = Tom , last = Clancy , authorlink = Tom Clancy , title = Patriot Games , page = 449 , passage = So if you fire the Phoenix inside that radius, he just can't evade it. The missile can pull more gees than any pilot can. }}
  • (US, slang) A guy.
  • * 1939 , (Raymond Chandler), The Big Sleep , Penguin 2011, p. 197:
  • Just off the highway there's a small garage and paint-shop run by a gee named Art Huck.

    Etymology 4

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (Ireland, slang) (vagina), (vulva) The New Partridge Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English p. 850, Tom Dalzell and Terry Victor. Routledge, 2006. ISBN: 0-415-25937-1.
  • * 1987 , (Roddy Doyle), (The Commitments) , King Farouk, Dublin:
  • The brassers, yeh know wha' I mean. The gee . Is tha' why?
  • * 1991 , (Roddy Doyle), , p. 65. Secker & Warburg (ISBN: 0-436-20052-X):
  • But he'd had to keep feeling them up and down from her knees up to her gee after she'd said that....
  • * 1992 , (Samuel Beckett), (Dream of Fair to Middling Women) , p. 71. John Calder (ISBN: 978-0714542133):
  • Lily Neary has a lovely gee and her pore Paddy got his B.A. and by the holy fly I wouldn't recommend you to ask me what class of a tree they were under when he put his hand on her and enjoyed that.
  • * 1995 , (w, Joseph O'Connor), (Red Roses and Petrol) , p. 7. Methuen (ISBN: 978-0413699909):
  • And I thought, gee is certainly something that gobshite knows all about.

    See also

    * ("gee" on Wikipedia)

    Anagrams

    *

    References

    English interjections ----