Gust vs Ge - What's the difference?

gust | ge |


As a noun gust

is a strong, abrupt rush of wind.

As a verb gust

is to blow in gusts.

As a proper noun Ge is

alternative form of Gaea.

gust

English

Etymology 1

Apparently from (etyl) gustr , though not recorded before Shakespeare.

Noun

(en noun)
  • A strong, abrupt rush of wind.
  • Any rush or outburst (of water, emotion etc.).
  • (Francis Bacon)
    Synonyms
    * windflaw

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To blow in gusts.
  • Etymology 2

    From (etyl) gustus ‘taste’. For the verb, compare (etyl) (lena) gustare, (etyl) gustare, (etyl) gustar.

    Noun

    (-)
  • (archaic) The physiological faculty of taste.
  • Relish, enjoyment, appreciation.
  • * Jeremy Taylor
  • An ox will relish the tender flesh of kids with as much gust and appetite.
  • * Alexander Pope
  • Destroy all creatures for thy sport or gust.
  • * 1942': ‘Yes, indeed,’ said Sava with solemn '''gust . — Rebecca West, ''Black Lamb and Grey Falcon (Canongate 2006, p. 1050)
  • Intellectual taste; fancy.
  • * Dryden
  • A choice of it may be made according to the gust and manner of the ancients.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (obsolete) To taste.
  • (obsolete) To have a relish for.
  • Anagrams

    * * ----

    ge

    Translingual

    (wikipedia Ge)

    Symbol

    (head)
  • Symbol for germanium.
  • ----