Hawm vs Gawm - What's the difference?

hawm | gawm |


As verbs the difference between hawm and gawm

is that hawm is (uk|dialect) to lounge; to loiter while gawm is (lb) or gawm can be .

As nouns the difference between hawm and gawm

is that hawm is (straw) while gawm is (foolish person).

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

hawm

English

Etymology 1

Uncertain.

Verb

(en verb)
  • (UK, dialect) To lounge; to loiter.
  • (Tennyson)

    Etymology 2

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (straw)
  • (Webster 1913)

    gawm

    English

    Etymology 1

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (foolish person).
  • * 1892 , The Awkward Squads'', in ''Littell's Living Age , volume 195, page 811:
  • "E-y-e-s front ! Och, luk in front av ye, for the love o' marcy, an' don't be bigger gawms than y'are." Again he took up his parade before the squad.
  • * 2002 , Joseph O'Conner, Star of the Sea , Vintage 2003, page 10:
  • The farmer would accuse his son of idleness; the son would retort that his father was a drunken gawm .
  • * 2013 , Flann O'Brien, O'Dea's Your Man'', in ''Collected Plays and Teleplays (ISBN 1564789888), page 417:
  • In twenty-wan years in this box I don't believe I've ever pulled down wan of those signal yokes without half-expecting a pint of stout to come out down below somewhere. And isn't it the right gawm I'd look if it did come.

    Etymology 2

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (lb)
  • * 1909 , Eugene Wood, The Merry Yule-Tide'', in ''The New England Magazine , page 438:
  • In just about a month to-morrow morning we'll crunch the candy into the rug at every step, and all we touch will be gawmed up and sticky.
  • * 1920 , The Monitor , page 13:
  • A nation cannot get anywhere if it has things gawmed up.
  • * 1905 , Charles Battell Loomis, Minerva's Manoeuvres: The Cheerful Facts , page 78:
  • "Might as well be dead as all gawmed up with that fly paper stuff."

    Etymology 3

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • * 1885 , Mary Catherine Rowsell, Traitor Or Patriot?: A Tale of the Rye-house Plot , page 278:
  • "Ay, 'tis indeed," she went on, "and Mistress Ruth has eyes an' ears, an' uses 'em to better purpose than some folks I know" — and she threw a significant glance at her bewildered better half — "as can only stand gaffin' and gawmin' at a body."
  • * 1888 , W. R. Credland, A Farm in the Fens'', in the ''Papers of the Manchester Literary Club , volume 14, page 267:
  • “Now, yah ha done! and don't be gawming there, yah soft-headed chawbacon. Go hoam to yar mother!”
  • * 1897 , J. Carmichael, Man and Beast'', in the ''Monthly Packet , page 392:
  • ‘There, be off with you! how can I figure with you standin' gawmin' at me there like a stuck pig with an orange in its mouth!’
  • * 1897 , James Prior, Ripple and Flood: A Novel , page 368:
  • "What does he want," she said, "gawmin' at me as if a wor a wild beast show?"