Gaffer vs Gauffer - What's the difference?

gaffer | gauffer |


As a noun gaffer

is rubberneck (undesired spectator a scene of crime or accident).

As a verb gauffer is

to plait, crimp, or flute; to goffer, as lace.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

gaffer

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) + (-er). The natural lighting on early film sets was adjusted by opening and closing flaps in the tent cloths, called gaff cloths or gaff flaps.

Noun

(en noun)
  • (film) A chief lighting technician for a motion-picture or television production.
  • A glassblower.
  • * 2003 , Jennifer Bosveld, Glass Works (page 18)
  • The apprentice carries a gather of glass on the blowpipe to the gaffer' s bench

    Etymology 2

    Likely a contraction of (godfather), but with the vowels influenced by (grandfather). Compare (etyl) , (etyl) gevatter.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (colloquial) An old man.
  • (British) A foreman.
  • An "Old Gaffer" is a sailor.
  • In Maritime regions "the Little Gaffer" is the baby in the house.
  • Synonyms
    * See also

    References

    * ----

    gauffer

    English

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To plait, crimp, or flute; to goffer, as lace.
  • (Webster 1913)