Paspy vs Gaspy - What's the difference?

paspy | gaspy |


As a noun paspy

is a kind of minuet, in triple time, of french origin, popular in the reign of (queen elizabeth i) and for some time after.

As an adjective gaspy is

resembling or characterised by gasps.

paspy

English

Noun

(paspies)
  • A kind of minuet, in triple time, of French origin, popular in the reign of (Queen Elizabeth I) and for some time after.
  • (Percy Smith)

    Synonyms

    * passing measure * passymeasure (Webster 1913)

    gaspy

    English

    Adjective

    (er)
  • Resembling or characterised by gasps.
  • * 1894 , Mark Twain, Tom Sawyer Abroad
  • Then his eyes began to spread and his breath to come out kinder gaspy like, and he says: "Ger-reat Scott, it's the LONGITUDE!"
  • * {{quote-news, year=2007, date=September 6, author=Mike Albo, title=The Department of Just Right, work=New York Times citation
  • , passage=When I tried it on, I discovered why my friends were so gaspy : it fit perfectly. }}