Gas vs Fume - What's the difference?

gas | fume |


As nouns the difference between gas and fume

is that gas is (uncountable|chemistry) matter in a state intermediate between liquid and plasma that can be contained only if it is fully surrounded by a solid (or in a bubble of liquid) (or held together by gravitational pull); it can condense into a liquid, or can (rarely) become a solid directly or gas can be (uncountable|us) gasoline; a derivative of petroleum used as fuel while fume is a gas or vapour/vapor that smells strongly or is dangerous to inhale fumes are solid particles formed by condensation from the gaseous state, eg metal oxides from volatilized metals they can flocculate and coalesce their particle size is between 01 and 1 micron (a micron is one millionth of a metre).

As verbs the difference between gas and fume

is that gas is to kill with poisonous or gas can be (us) to give a vehicle more fuel in order to accelerate it while fume is to emit fumes.

As a adjective gas

is (ireland|colloquial) comical, zany.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

gas

English

(wikipedia gas)

Etymology 1

From (etyl) gas, a word coined by chemist . From (etyl) .

Noun

  • (uncountable, chemistry) Matter in a state intermediate between liquid and plasma that can be contained only if it is fully surrounded by a solid (or in a bubble of liquid) (or held together by gravitational pull); it can condense into a liquid, or can (rarely) become a solid directly.
  • * {{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=July-August, author= Lee S. Langston, magazine=(American Scientist)
  • , title= The Adaptable Gas Turbine , passage=Turbines have been around for a long time—windmills and water wheels are early examples. The name comes from the Latin turbo'', meaning ''vortex , and thus the defining property of a turbine is that a fluid or gas turns the blades of a rotor, which is attached to a shaft that can perform useful work.}}
  • (countable, chemistry) A chemical element or compound in such a state.
  • (uncountable) A flammable gaseous hydrocarbon or hydrocarbon mixture (typically predominantly methane) used as a fuel, e.g. for cooking, heating, electricity generation or as a fuel in internal combustion engines in vehicles.
  • (countable) A hob on a gas cooker.
  • (US) Methane or other waste gases trapped in one's belly as a result of the digestive process.
  • (slang) A humorous or entertaining event or person.
  • (baseball) A fastball.
  • Synonyms
    * (state of matter) vapor / vapour * (digestive process) wind, fart (when gas is released) (qualifier)
    Derived terms
    * cooking with gas * gas giant * gaslight * gasometer * LP gas * natural gas * shale gas
    See also
    * fluid * liquid * solid

    Verb

  • To kill with poisonous .
  • To talk, chat.
  • * {{quote-book, year=1899, author=(Stephen Crane)
  • , title=, chapter=1 , passage=[…] (it was the town's humour to be always gassing of phantom investors who were likely to come any moment and pay a thousand prices for everything) — “[…] Them rich fellers, they don't make no bad breaks with their money. […]”}}
  • To emit gas.
  • Etymology 2

    Shortening of (gasoline).

    Noun

    (-)
  • (uncountable, US) Gasoline; a derivative of petroleum used as fuel.
  • (US) gas pedal
  • Synonyms
    * (gasoline) gasoline (US), petrol (British) * See also .

    Verb

  • (US) To give a vehicle more fuel in order to accelerate it.
  • The cops are coming. Gas it!
  • (US) To fill (a vehicle's fuel tank) with fuel
  • Synonyms
    * (accelerate) step on the gas, hit the gas * (filll fuel tank) refuel

    Etymology 3

    Compare the slang usage of "a gas", above.

    Adjective

    (-)
  • (Ireland, colloquial) comical, zany.
  • Mary's new boyfriend is a gas man.
    It was gas when the bird flew into the classroom.
    Usage notes
    * This is common in speech, but rarely used in writing.

    Anagrams

    * ----

    fume

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A gas or vapour/vapor that smells strongly or is dangerous to inhale. Fumes are solid particles formed by condensation from the gaseous state, e.g. metal oxides from volatilized metals. They can flocculate and coalesce. Their particle size is between 0.1 and 1 micron. (A micron is one millionth of a metre)
  • Don't stand around in there breathing the fumes while the adhesive cures.
  • * T. Warton
  • the fumes of new shorn hay
  • A material that has been vaporized from the solid state to the gas state and re-coalesced to the solid state.
  • Rage or excitement which deprives the mind of self-control.
  • the fumes of passion
    (South)
  • Anything unsubstantial or airy; idle conceit; vain imagination.
  • * Francis Bacon
  • a show of fumes and fancies
  • The incense of praise; inordinate flattery.
  • * Burton
  • to smother him with fumes and eulogies

    Verb

    (fum)
  • To emit fumes.
  • * Milton
  • where the golden altar fumed
  • * Roscommon
  • Silenus lay, / Whose constant cups lay fuming to his brain.
  • To expose something (especially wood) to ammonia fumes in order to produce dark tints.
  • To feel or express great anger.
  • He's still fuming about the argument they had yesterday.
  • * Dryden
  • He frets, he fumes , he stares, he stamps the ground.
  • * Sir Walter Scott
  • Her mother did fret, and her father did fume .
  • To be as in a mist; to be dulled and stupefied.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Keep his brain fuming .
  • To pass off in fumes or vapours.
  • * Cheyne
  • Their parts are kept from fuming away by their fixity.

    Usage notes

    * In the sense of strong-smelling or dangerous vapor, the noun is typically plural, as in the example. ----