Claim vs Gaol - What's the difference?

claim | gaol |


As nouns the difference between claim and gaol

is that claim is claim while gaol is (uk|ireland|australia).

As a verb gaol is

(british).

claim

English

Alternative forms

* claym (obsolete)

Noun

(en noun)
  • A demand of ownership made for something (e.g. claim ownership, claim victory).
  • A new statement of truth made about something, usually when the statement has yet to be verified.
  • A demand of ownership for previously unowned land (e.g. in the gold rush, oil rush)
  • (legal) A legal demand for compensation or damages.
  • Usage notes

    * Demand ownership of land not previously owned. One usually stakes a claim. * The legal sense. One usually makes a claim. See

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To demand ownership of.
  • To state a new fact, typically without providing evidence to prove it is true.
  • To demand ownership or right to use for land.
  • (legal) To demand compensation or damages through the courts.
  • To be entitled to anything; to deduce a right or title; to have a claim.
  • * John Locke
  • We must know how the first ruler, from whom anyone claims , came by his authority.
  • To proclaim.
  • (Spenser)
  • To call or name.
  • (Spenser)

    Anagrams

    * English reporting verbs ----

    gaol

    English

    (wikipedia gaol)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (UK, Ireland, Australia)
  • * {{quote-book, year=1963, author=(Margery Allingham)
  • , title=(The China Governess) , chapter=3 citation , passage=‘[…] There's every Staffordshire crime-piece ever made in this cabinet, and that's unique. The Van Hoyer Museum in New York hasn't that very rare second version of Maria Marten's Red Barn over there, nor the little Frederick George Manning—he was the criminal Dickens saw hanged on the roof of the gaol in Horsemonger Lane, by the way—’}}

    Usage notes

    Gaol'' was the more common spelling between about 1760 and 1830,https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=gaol%2Cjail&year_start=1700&year_end=2000&corpus=15 and is still preferred in proper names in some regions. Most Australian newspapers use (m) rather than ''gaol''''', citing either narrower print width or the possibility of transposing letters in ''gaol'' to produce ''goal''.'''1996 , Sally A. White, ''Reporting in Australia , page 275

    Synonyms

    * See also

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (British)
  • Derived terms

    * *

    References

    Anagrams

    * (l) * (l) ----