Gaol vs Aim - What's the difference?

gaol | aim |


As nouns the difference between gaol and aim

is that gaol is (uk|ireland|australia) while aim is the pointing of a weapon, as a gun, a dart, or an arrow, or object, in the line of direction with the object intended to be struck; the line of fire; the direction of anything, as a spear, a blow, a discourse, a remark, towards a particular point or object, with a view to strike or affect it.

As verbs the difference between gaol and aim

is that gaol is (british) while aim is to point or direct a missile weapon, or a weapon which propels as missile, towards an object or spot with the intent of hitting it; as, to aim at a fox, or at a target.

As a initialism aim is

aim; aol instant messenger.

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

gaol

English

(wikipedia gaol)

Noun

(en noun)
  • (UK, Ireland, Australia)
  • * {{quote-book, year=1963, author=(Margery Allingham)
  • , title=(The China Governess) , chapter=3 citation , passage=‘[…] There's every Staffordshire crime-piece ever made in this cabinet, and that's unique. The Van Hoyer Museum in New York hasn't that very rare second version of Maria Marten's Red Barn over there, nor the little Frederick George Manning—he was the criminal Dickens saw hanged on the roof of the gaol in Horsemonger Lane, by the way—’}}

    Usage notes

    Gaol'' was the more common spelling between about 1760 and 1830,https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=gaol%2Cjail&year_start=1700&year_end=2000&corpus=15 and is still preferred in proper names in some regions. Most Australian newspapers use (m) rather than ''gaol''''', citing either narrower print width or the possibility of transposing letters in ''gaol'' to produce ''goal''.'''1996 , Sally A. White, ''Reporting in Australia , page 275

    Synonyms

    * See also

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (British)
  • Derived terms

    * *

    References

    Anagrams

    * (l) * (l) ----

    aim

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The pointing of a weapon, as a gun, a dart, or an arrow, or object, in the line of direction with the object intended to be struck; the line of fire; the direction of anything, as a spear, a blow, a discourse, a remark, towards a particular point or object, with a view to strike or affect it.
  • The point intended to be hit, or object intended to be attained or affected.
  • Intention; purpose; design; scheme.
  • My number one aim in life is to make money to make my parents, siblings and kids happy .
  • (obsolete) Conjecture; guess.
  • * Shakespeare
  • What you would work me to, I have some aim .
    Synonyms
    * (intention) aspiration, design, end, ettle, intention, mint, object, purpose, scheme, scope, tendency * See also

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To point or direct a missile weapon, or a weapon which propels as missile, towards an object or spot with the intent of hitting it; as, to aim at a fox, or at a target.
  • To direct the intention or purpose; to attempt the accomplishment of a purpose; to try to gain; to endeavor;—followed by at, or by an infinitive; as, to aim at distinction; to aim to do well.
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=1 , passage=The stories did not seem to me to touch life. They were plainly intended to have a bracing moral effect, and perhaps had this result for the people at whom they were aimed .}}
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-06-22, volume=407, issue=8841, page=76, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= Snakes and ladders , passage=Risk is everywhere.
  • To direct or point, as a weapon, at a particular object; to direct, as a missile, an act, or a proceeding, at, to, or against an object; as, to aim a musket or an arrow, the fist or a blow (at something); to aim a satire or a reflection (at some person or vice).
  • (obsolete) To guess or conjecture.
  • (Shakespeare)
    Usage notes
    * Sense 3. This is a catenative verb that takes the to infinitive . See
    Derived terms
    * aim at *

    Etymology 2

    Initialism

    (Initialism) (head)
  • AIM; AOL Instant Messenger.
  • Anagrams

    *