Gang vs Tone - What's the difference?

gang | tone |


As verbs the difference between gang and tone

is that gang is to go; walk; proceed or gang can be to band together as a group or gang or gang can be while tone is to give a particular tone to.

As nouns the difference between gang and tone

is that gang is a going, journey; a course, path, track while tone is (music) a specific pitch.

As a pronoun tone is

the one (of two).

gang

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) gangen, from (etyl) . Ultimately: related to etym. 2, see below.

Verb

(en verb)
  • To go; walk; proceed.
  • Derived terms
    * (l) * (l) * (l) * * (l) * (l) * (l) * (l)

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) gang, from (etyl) . Cognate with Dutch gang, Icelandic gangur, Norwegian gang ("hallway"), Old Norse gangr (passage, hallway).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A going, journey; a course, path, track.
  • * 1840 , Ralph Waldo Emerson, "Woodnotes I":
  • In unploughed Maine he sought the lumberers’ gang / Where from a hundred lakes young rivers sprang
  • * 1869 , Papa André , Once a Week, page 418/1:
  • That week was also called the Gang Week, from the Saxon'' ganger'', to go; and the Rogation days were termed the Gang Days.
  • * 1895 , Frederick Tupper Jr., Anglo-Saxon Dæg-Mæl , Modern Language Association of America, page 229:
  • Neither Marshall nor Bouterwek makes clear the connection existing between the Gang-days and the Major and Minor Litanies.
  • A number going in company; a number of friends or persons associated for a particular purpose.
  • the Gashouse Gang
    The gang from our office is going out for drinks Friday night.
  • A group of laborers under one foreman; a squad.
  • a gang''' of sailors; a railroad '''gang .
  • (US) A criminal group with a common cultural background and identifying features, often associated with a particular section of a city.
  • a youth gang'''; a neighborhood '''gang'''; motorcycle '''gang .
  • A group of criminals or alleged criminals who band together for mutual protection and profit, or a group of politicians united in furtherance of a political goal.
  • the Winter Hill gang'''; the '''Gang of Four.
    Not all members of the Gang of Six are consistent in their opposition to filibuster.
  • (US) A chain gang.
  • A combination of similar tools or implements arranged so as, by acting together, to save time or labor; a set.
  • a gang''' of saws; a '''gang of plows.
  • A set; all required for an outfit.
  • a new gang of stays.
  • (electrics) A number of switches or other electrical devices wired into one unit and covered by one faceplate.
  • an outlet gang''' box; a double '''gang switch.
  • (electrics) A group of wires attached as a bundle.
  • a gang of wires
    Do a drop for the telephone gang''', then another drop for the internet '''gang , both through the ceiling of the wiring closet.
  • (mining) The mineral substance which encloses a vein; a matrix; a gangue.
  • Derived terms
    * anti-gang * chain gang * gang bang * gang box * gang-buster * gangboard * gang-cask * gangdom * gangland * gangplank * gang rape * gangsman * gang switch * gangster * gang up * gang up on * gangway * ingang * outgang * street gang * umgang * upgang

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To band together as a group or gang.
  • "Let's gang up on them."

    See also

    *

    Etymology 3

    See (gan).

    tone

    English

    (wikipedia tone)

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) ton, from (etyl)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (music) A specific pitch.
  • (music) (in the diatonic scale ) An interval of a major second.
  • (music) (in a Gregorian chant ) A recitational melody.
  • The character of a sound, especially the timbre of an instrument or voice.
  • General character, mood, or trend.
  • Her rousing speech gave an upbeat tone to the rest of the evening.
  • (linguistics) The pitch of a word that distinguishes a difference in meaning, for example in Chinese.
  • (dated) A whining style of speaking; a kind of mournful or artificial strain of voice; an affected speaking with a measured rhythm and a regular rise and fall of the voice.
  • Children often read with a tone .
  • (literature) The manner in which speech or writing is expressed.
  • * W. C. Bryant
  • Their tone was dissatisfied, almost menacing.
  • (obsolete) State of mind; temper; mood.
  • * Bolingbroke
  • The strange situation I am in and the melancholy state of public affairs, from a philosophical tone or temper, to the drudgery of private and public business.
  • The shade or quality of a colour.
  • The favourable effect of a picture produced by the combination of light and shade, or of colours.
  • This picture has tone .
  • The definition and firmness of a muscle or organ. see also: tonus
  • (biology) The state of a living body or of any of its organs or parts in which the functions are healthy and performed with due vigor.
  • (biology) Normal tension or responsiveness to stimuli.
  • Synonyms
    * (an interval of a major second ): whole tone
    Derived terms
    * dial tone * halftone * muscle tone * semitone * tonebar, tone bar * tone of voice

    Verb

    (ton)
  • to give a particular tone to
  • to change the colour of
  • to make (something) firmer
  • to harmonize, especially in colour
  • To utter with an affected tone.
  • Synonyms
    * (give a particular tone to) * (change the colour of) color/colour, dye, paint, tint * (make firmer) firm, firm up, tone up * (harmonize) harmonise/harmonize * (utter with an affected tone)
    Derived terms
    * toned * tone down * toner * tone up * tony, toney (affected tone)

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) tone, ton, toon, from the incorrect division of ; see also (l).

    Pronoun

    (English Pronouns)
  • The one (of two).
  • *, Bk.X, Ch.lxiij:
  • *:So wythin the thirde day, there cam to the cité thes two brethirne: the tone hyght Sir Helyus and the other hyght Helake
  • Statistics

    *

    Anagrams

    * Eton * note ----