Madded vs Gadded - What's the difference?

madded | gadded |


As verbs the difference between madded and gadded

is that madded is (mad) while gadded is (gad).

madded

English

Verb

(head)
  • (mad)

  • mad

    English

    Adjective

    (madder)
  • Insane; crazy, mentally deranged.
  • * Shakespeare
  • I have heard my grandsire say full oft, / Extremity of griefs would make men mad .
  • Angry, annoyed.
  • * , chapter=6
  • , title= Mr. Pratt's Patients , passage=She was so mad she wouldn't speak to me for quite a spell, but at last I coaxed her into going up to Miss Emmeline's room and fetching down a tintype of the missing Deacon man.}}
  • Wildly confused or excited.
  • to be mad with terror, lust, or hatred
  • * Bible, Jer. 1. 88
  • It is the land of graven images, and they are mad upon their idols.
  • * 1787: The Fair Syrian, R. Bage, p.314
  • My brother, quiet as a cat, seems perfectly contented with the internal feelings of his felicity. The Marquis, mad as a kitten, is all in motion to express it, from tongue to heel.
  • Extremely foolish or unwise; irrational; imprudent.
  • Extremely enthusiastic about; crazy about; infatuated with; overcome with desire for.
  • (of animals) Abnormally ferocious or furious; or, rabid, affected with rabies.
  • (slang, chiefly Northeastern US) Intensifier, signifies an abundance or high quality of a thing; , much or many.
  • (of a compass needle) Having impaired polarity.
  • Usage notes

    While within the United States and Canada, the word mad'' ''does'' generally imply ''anger'' rather than insanity, such usage is still considered informal. Furthermore, if one is described as having "gone mad" or "went mad", this will unquestionably be taken as denoting ''insanity''''', and not anger. Meanwhile, if one "is mad at" something or has "been mad about" something, it will be assumed that they are '''''angered'' rather than insane. In addition, if the word is understood as being used literally, it will most likely be taken as meaning "insane". Also, in addition to the former, such derivatives as "madness", "madman", "madhouse" and "madly" ''purely denote insanity, irrespective of whether one is in the Commonwealth or in the United States. Lastly, within Commonwealth countries other than Canada, mad'' typically implies the ''insane'' or ''crazy'' sense more so than the ''angry sense.

    Synonyms

    * (insane) See also * (angry) See also * wicked, mighty, kinda, , hella.

    Adverb

    (-)
  • (slang, New England, New York, and, UK, dialect) Intensifier; to a large degree; extremely; exceedingly; very; unbelievably.
  • He was driving mad slow.
    It's mad hot today.
    He seems mad keen on her.

    Synonyms

    * hella; helluv;

    Derived terms

    * mad as a hatter * madden * madding * madhouse * madly

    Verb

    (madd)
  • To madden, to anger, to frustrate.
  • * c''. 1595 , (William Shakespeare), '' , Act V Scene 5:
  • This musick mads me, let it sound no more.
  • *, I.2.4.iv:
  • He that mads others, if he were so humoured, would be as mad himself, as much grieved and tormented […].

    gadded

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (gad)

  • gad

    English

    Etymology 1

    Taboo deformation of (God).

    Interjection

    (en interjection)
  • An exclamatory interjection roughly equivalent to 'by God', 'goodness gracious', 'for goodness' sake'.
  • 1905' '' That's the trouble -- it was too easy for you -- you got reckless -- thought you could turn me inside out, and chuck me in the gutter like an empty purse. But, by '''gad , that ain't playing fair: that's dodging the rules of the game.'' — Edith Wharton, '' House of Mirth.
    Derived terms
    * egads * egad

    Etymology 2

    (etyl) .

    Verb

    (gadd)
  • To move from one location to another in an apparently random and frivolous manner.
  • * 1852 , Alice Cary, Clovernook ....
  • This, I suppose, is the virgin who abideth still in the house with you. She is not given, I hope, to gadding overmuch, nor to vain and foolish decorations of her person with ear-rings and finger-rings, and crisping-pins: for such are unprofitable, yea, abominable.
  • *
  • Synonyms
    * gallivant
    Derived terms
    * gadabout * gaddish, gaddishness

    Etymology 3

    From (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A sharp-pointed object; a goad.
  • * 1885 , Detroit Free Press. , December 17
  • Twain finds his voice after a short search for it and when he impels it forward it is a good, strong, steady voice in harness until the driver becomes absent-minded, when it stops to rest, and then the gad must be used to drive it on again.
  • (obsolete) A metal bar.
  • * 1485 , Thomas Malory, Le Morte Darthur , Book XV:
  • they sette uppon hym and drew oute their swerdys to have slayne hym – but there wolde no swerde byghte on hym more than uppon a gadde of steele, for the Hyghe Lorde which he served, He hym preserved.
  • * Moxon
  • Flemish steel some in bars and some in gads .
  • A pointed metal tool for breaking or chiselling rock, especially in mining.
  • * Shakespeare
  • I will go get a leaf of brass, / And with a gad of steel will write these words.
  • * 2006 , Thomas Pynchon, Against the Day , Vintage 2007, p. 327:
  • Frank was able to keep his eyes open long enough to check his bed with a miner's gad and douse the electric lamp
  • (dated, metallurgy) An indeterminate measure of metal produced by a furnace, perhaps equivalent to the bloom, perhaps weighing around 100 pounds.
  • * 1957 , H.R. Schubert, History of the British Iron and Steel Industry , p. 146.
  • ''Twice a day a 'gad' of iron, i.e., a bloom weighing 1 cwt. was produced, which took from six to seven hours.
  • A spike on a gauntlet; a gadling.
  • (Fairholt)
  • (UK, US, dialect) A rod or stick, such as a fishing rod, a measuring rod, or a rod used to drive cattle with.
  • (Halliwell)
    (Bartlett)

    Anagrams

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