Godded vs Gadded - What's the difference?

godded | gadded |


As verbs the difference between godded and gadded

is that godded is (god) while gadded is (gad).

godded

English

Verb

(head)
  • (god)
  • Anagrams

    *

    god

    English

    Noun

    (wikipedia god) (en noun)
  • A deity.
  • # A supernatural, typically immortal being with superior powers.
  • # A male deity.
  • #* 2002 , Chuck Palahniuk, Lullaby :
  • When ancient Greeks had a thought, it occurred to them as a god or goddess giving an order. Apollo was telling them to be brave. Athena was telling them to fall in love.
  • # A supreme being; God.
  • The most frequently used name for the Islamic god is Allah.
  • An idol.
  • # A representation of a deity, especially a statue or statuette.
  • # Something or someone particularly revered, worshipped, idealized, admired and/or followed.
  • #* Bible, Phil. iii. 19
  • whose god is their belly
  • (metaphor) A person in a high position of authority; a powerful ruler or tyrant.
  • An exceedingly handsome man.
  • Lounging on the beach were several Greek gods .
  • * Wilfred Owen, Disabled (poem)
  • Someone had said he'd look a god in kilts.
  • (Internet) The person who owns and runs a multi-user dungeon.
  • * 1996 , Andy Eddy, Internet after hours
  • The gods usually have several wizards, or "immortals," to assist them in building the MUD.
  • * 2003 , David Lojek, Emote to the Max (page 11)
  • The wizzes are only the junior grade of the MUD illuminati. The people who attain the senior grade of MUD freemasonry by starting their own MUD, with all due hubris, are known as gods .

    Usage notes

    The word god is often applied both to males and to females. The word was originally neuter in Proto-Germanic; monotheistic – notably Judeo-Christian – usage completely shifted the gender to masculine, necessitating the development of a feminine form, goddess.

    Synonyms

    * (supernatural being with superior powers) deity, See also

    Derived terms

    (terms derived from "god") * demigod * God * god-awful * god-child, godchild * goddam, goddamn * goddaughter * Goddess * goddess * godded * godding * godfather * god-fearing * god forbid * god-forsaken, godforsaken * God-given * godhead * godhood * god-king, god king * godless * godlike * godliness * godling * godly * godmother * God of the gaps * godparent * godsend * godship * godson * Godspeed * godward * household god * ungodly

    Proper noun

    (en-proper-noun)
  • * 1530 , , An aun?were vnto Syr Thomas Mores Dialogue'' in ''The whole workes of W. Tyndall, Iohn Frith, and Doct. Barnes, three worthy Martyrs, and principall teachers of this Churche of England, collected and compiled in one Tome togither, beyng before ?cattered, & now in Print here exhibited to the Church (1573), page 271/2:
  • * 1900 , , "The Happy Man" in The Wild Knight and Other Poems :
  • Golgotha's ghastly trinity—
    Three persons and one god .

    Verb

    (godd)
  • To idolize.
  • * {{quote-book, 1608, (William Shakespeare), , section=Act V Scene III,
  • , passage=CORIOLANUS: This last old man, / Whom with a crack'd heart I have sent to Rome, / Loved me above the measure of a father; / Nay, godded me, indeed.}}
  • * a . 1866 , (Edward Bulwer Lytton), "Death and Sisyphus".
  • To men the first necessity is gods; / And if the gods were not, / " Man would invent them, tho' they godded stones.
  • * 2001 , Conrad C. Fink, Sportswriting: The Lively Game , page 78
  • "Godded him up" ... It's the fear of discerning journalists: Does coverage of athletic stars, on field and off, approach beatification of the living?
  • to deify
  • * 1595 , (Edmund Spenser), Colin Clouts Come Home Againe .
  • Then got he bow and fhafts of gold and lead, / In which fo fell and puiflant he grew, / That Jove himfelfe his powre began to dread, / And, taking up to heaven, him godded new.
  • * 1951 , (Eric Voegelin), Dante Germino ed., The New Science of Politics: An Introduction (1987), page 125
  • The superman marks the end of a road on which we find such figures as the "godded man" of English Reformation mystics
  • * 1956 , , Fritz Eichenberg, , page 241
  • "She is so lately godded that she is still a rather poor goddess, Stranger.

    See also

    * agnosticism * apatheism * atheism * deism * divine * henotheism * kathenotheism * gnosticism * monolatrism * monotheism * pandeism * pantheism * polytheism * Tetragrammaton * theism

    References

    *

    Anagrams

    * (l), (l) 1000 English basic words ----

    gadded

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (gad)

  • gad

    English

    Etymology 1

    Taboo deformation of (God).

    Interjection

    (en interjection)
  • An exclamatory interjection roughly equivalent to 'by God', 'goodness gracious', 'for goodness' sake'.
  • 1905' '' That's the trouble -- it was too easy for you -- you got reckless -- thought you could turn me inside out, and chuck me in the gutter like an empty purse. But, by '''gad , that ain't playing fair: that's dodging the rules of the game.'' — Edith Wharton, '' House of Mirth.
    Derived terms
    * egads * egad

    Etymology 2

    (etyl) .

    Verb

    (gadd)
  • To move from one location to another in an apparently random and frivolous manner.
  • * 1852 , Alice Cary, Clovernook ....
  • This, I suppose, is the virgin who abideth still in the house with you. She is not given, I hope, to gadding overmuch, nor to vain and foolish decorations of her person with ear-rings and finger-rings, and crisping-pins: for such are unprofitable, yea, abominable.
  • *
  • Synonyms
    * gallivant
    Derived terms
    * gadabout * gaddish, gaddishness

    Etymology 3

    From (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A sharp-pointed object; a goad.
  • * 1885 , Detroit Free Press. , December 17
  • Twain finds his voice after a short search for it and when he impels it forward it is a good, strong, steady voice in harness until the driver becomes absent-minded, when it stops to rest, and then the gad must be used to drive it on again.
  • (obsolete) A metal bar.
  • * 1485 , Thomas Malory, Le Morte Darthur , Book XV:
  • they sette uppon hym and drew oute their swerdys to have slayne hym – but there wolde no swerde byghte on hym more than uppon a gadde of steele, for the Hyghe Lorde which he served, He hym preserved.
  • * Moxon
  • Flemish steel some in bars and some in gads .
  • A pointed metal tool for breaking or chiselling rock, especially in mining.
  • * Shakespeare
  • I will go get a leaf of brass, / And with a gad of steel will write these words.
  • * 2006 , Thomas Pynchon, Against the Day , Vintage 2007, p. 327:
  • Frank was able to keep his eyes open long enough to check his bed with a miner's gad and douse the electric lamp
  • (dated, metallurgy) An indeterminate measure of metal produced by a furnace, perhaps equivalent to the bloom, perhaps weighing around 100 pounds.
  • * 1957 , H.R. Schubert, History of the British Iron and Steel Industry , p. 146.
  • ''Twice a day a 'gad' of iron, i.e., a bloom weighing 1 cwt. was produced, which took from six to seven hours.
  • A spike on a gauntlet; a gadling.
  • (Fairholt)
  • (UK, US, dialect) A rod or stick, such as a fishing rod, a measuring rod, or a rod used to drive cattle with.
  • (Halliwell)
    (Bartlett)

    Anagrams

    * ----