Gladded vs Gadded - What's the difference?

gladded | gadded |


As verbs the difference between gladded and gadded

is that gladded is (glad) while gadded is (gad).

gladded

English

Verb

(head)
  • (glad)

  • glad

    English

    Adjective

    (en-adj)
  • Pleased, happy, gratified.
  • :
  • *(Bible), (w) x.1:
  • *:A wise son maketh a glad father.
  • *(William Shakespeare) (c.1564–1616)
  • *:Glad am I that your highness is so armed.
  • *
  • *:"I was dragged up at the workhouse school till I was twelve. Then I ran away and sold papers in the streets, and anything else that I could pick up a few coppers by—except steal. I never did that. I always made up my mind I'd be a big man some day, and—I'm glad I didn't steal."
  • (lb) Having a bright or cheerful appearance; expressing or exciting joy; producing gladness.
  • *Sir (Philip Sidney) (1554-1586)
  • *:Her conversation / More glad to me than to a miser money is.
  • *(John Milton) (1608-1674)
  • *:Glad' evening and ' glad morn crowned the fourth day.
  • Usage notes

    The comparative "gladder" and superlative "gladdest" are not incorrect but may be unfamiliar enough to be taken as such. In both American and British English, the forms "more" and "most glad" are equally common in print and more common in daily speech.

    Antonyms

    * sorrowful * sad * downcast * peevish * cranky * heavy * depressed

    Derived terms

    * engladden * gladden * gladly

    Verb

    (gladd)
  • To make glad; to cheer; to gladden; to exhilarate.
  • * Dryden
  • that which gladded all the warrior train
  • * Alexander Pope
  • Each drinks the juice that glads the heart of man.
  • * 1922 , , Epithalamium , line 3
  • God that glads the lover's heart

    Statistics

    * 1000 English basic words ----

    gadded

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (gad)

  • gad

    English

    Etymology 1

    Taboo deformation of (God).

    Interjection

    (en interjection)
  • An exclamatory interjection roughly equivalent to 'by God', 'goodness gracious', 'for goodness' sake'.
  • 1905' '' That's the trouble -- it was too easy for you -- you got reckless -- thought you could turn me inside out, and chuck me in the gutter like an empty purse. But, by '''gad , that ain't playing fair: that's dodging the rules of the game.'' — Edith Wharton, '' House of Mirth.
    Derived terms
    * egads * egad

    Etymology 2

    (etyl) .

    Verb

    (gadd)
  • To move from one location to another in an apparently random and frivolous manner.
  • * 1852 , Alice Cary, Clovernook ....
  • This, I suppose, is the virgin who abideth still in the house with you. She is not given, I hope, to gadding overmuch, nor to vain and foolish decorations of her person with ear-rings and finger-rings, and crisping-pins: for such are unprofitable, yea, abominable.
  • *
  • Synonyms
    * gallivant
    Derived terms
    * gadabout * gaddish, gaddishness

    Etymology 3

    From (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A sharp-pointed object; a goad.
  • * 1885 , Detroit Free Press. , December 17
  • Twain finds his voice after a short search for it and when he impels it forward it is a good, strong, steady voice in harness until the driver becomes absent-minded, when it stops to rest, and then the gad must be used to drive it on again.
  • (obsolete) A metal bar.
  • * 1485 , Thomas Malory, Le Morte Darthur , Book XV:
  • they sette uppon hym and drew oute their swerdys to have slayne hym – but there wolde no swerde byghte on hym more than uppon a gadde of steele, for the Hyghe Lorde which he served, He hym preserved.
  • * Moxon
  • Flemish steel some in bars and some in gads .
  • A pointed metal tool for breaking or chiselling rock, especially in mining.
  • * Shakespeare
  • I will go get a leaf of brass, / And with a gad of steel will write these words.
  • * 2006 , Thomas Pynchon, Against the Day , Vintage 2007, p. 327:
  • Frank was able to keep his eyes open long enough to check his bed with a miner's gad and douse the electric lamp
  • (dated, metallurgy) An indeterminate measure of metal produced by a furnace, perhaps equivalent to the bloom, perhaps weighing around 100 pounds.
  • * 1957 , H.R. Schubert, History of the British Iron and Steel Industry , p. 146.
  • ''Twice a day a 'gad' of iron, i.e., a bloom weighing 1 cwt. was produced, which took from six to seven hours.
  • A spike on a gauntlet; a gadling.
  • (Fairholt)
  • (UK, US, dialect) A rod or stick, such as a fishing rod, a measuring rod, or a rod used to drive cattle with.
  • (Halliwell)
    (Bartlett)

    Anagrams

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