Crimp vs Frizzle - What's the difference?

crimp | frizzle | Related terms |

Crimp is a related term of frizzle.


As nouns the difference between crimp and frizzle

is that crimp is a fastener or a fastening method that secures parts by bending metal around a joint and squeezing it together, often with a tool that adds indentations to capture the parts or crimp can be an agent making it his business to procure seamen, soldiers, etc, especially by seducing, decoying, entrapping, or impressing them [since the passing of the merchant shipping act of 1854, applied to one who infringes sub-section 1 of this act, ie to a person other than the owner, master, etc, who engages seamen without a license from the board of trade] while frizzle is a curl; a lock of hair crisped.

As verbs the difference between crimp and frizzle

is that crimp is to fasten by bending metal so that it squeezes around the parts to be fastened or crimp can be to impress (seamen or soldiers); to entrap, to decoy while frizzle is (label) to fry something until crisp and curled.

As an adjective crimp

is (obsolete) easily crumbled; friable; brittle.

crimp

English

Etymology 1

(etyl) crempen, from (etyl) . Germanic etymology. Cognate to Dutch krimpen, via Middle Dutch crimpen, to Low German crimpen, Origins, p. 130, by Eric Partridge and to Faroese . From or cognate to Old Norse kreppa. Possible cognate to cramp.

Adjective

  • (obsolete) Easily crumbled; friable; brittle.
  • * J. Philips
  • Now the fowler treads the crimp earth.
  • (obsolete) Weak; inconsistent; contradictory.
  • * Arbuthnot
  • The evidence is crimp ; the witnesses swear backward and forward, and contradict themselves.

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A fastener or a fastening method that secures parts by bending metal around a joint and squeezing it together, often with a tool that adds indentations to capture the parts.
  • The strap was held together by a simple metal crimp .
  • (obsolete, UK, dialect) A coal broker.
  • (De Foe)
  • (obsolete) One who decoys or entraps men into the military or naval service.
  • (Marryat)
  • (obsolete) A keeper of a low lodging house where sailors and emigrants are entrapped and fleeced.
  • (usually, in the plural) A hairstyle which has been crimped, or shaped so it bends back and forth in many short kinks.
  • (obsolete) A card game.
  • (Ben Jonson)

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To fasten by bending metal so that it squeezes around the parts to be fastened.
  • He crimped the wire in place.
  • To pinch and hold; to seize.
  • To style hair into a crimp.
  • To join the edges of food products. For example: Cornish pasty, pies, jiaozi, Jamaican patty, and sealed crustless sandwiches.
  • Etymology 2

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • An agent making it his business to procure seamen, soldiers, etc., especially by seducing, decoying, entrapping, or impressing them. [Since the passing of the Merchant Shipping Act of 1854, applied to one who infringes sub-section 1 of this Act, i.e. to a person other than the owner, master, etc., who engages seamen without a license from the Board of Trade.]
  • * (rfdate)
  • When a master of a ship..has lost any of his hands, he applies to a crimp ..who makes it his business to seduce the men belonging to some other ship.
  • * (rfdate)
  • Trepanned into the West India Company's service by the crimps or silver-coopers as a common soldier.
  • * (rfdate)
  • Offering three guineas ahead to the crimps for every good able seaman.
  • * (rfdate)
  • I hear there are plenty of good men stowed away by the crimps at different places.
  • * (rfdate)
  • Sallying forth at night..he came near being carried off by a gang of crimps .
  • * (rfdate)
  • In the high and palmy days of the crimp , the pirate, the press-gang.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To impress (seamen or soldiers); to entrap, to decoy.
  • Coaxing and courting with intent to crimp him. — Carlyle.
  • * (rfdate)
  • Plundering corn and crimping recruits.
  • * (rfdate)
  • Clutching at him, to crimp him or impress him.
  • * (rfdate)
  • The cruel folly which crimps a number of ignorant and innocent peasants, dresses them up in uniform..and sends them off to kill and be killed.
  • * (rfdate)
  • The Egyptian Government crimped negroes in the streets of Cairo.
  • * (rfdate)
  • Why not create customers in the Queen's dominions..instead of trying..to crimp them in other countries?

    References

    * *

    frizzle

    English

    Alternative forms

    * (l), (l), (l), (l)

    Verb

    (en-verb)
  • (label) To fry something until crisp and curled.
  • (label) To scorch.
  • *{{quote-book, year=1935, author= George Goodchild
  • , title=Death on the Centre Court, chapter=3 , passage=It had been his intention to go to Wimbledon, but as he himself said: “Why be blooming well frizzled when you can hear all the results over the wireless. And results are all that concern me. […]”}}
  • (label) To fry noisily.
  • To curl or crisp, as hair; to frizz; to crinkle.
  • (Gay)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A curl; a lock of hair crisped.
  • * 1911 , (Jack London), The Whale Tooth
  • *:The frizzle -headed man-eaters were loath to leave their fleshpots so long as the harvest of human carcases was plentiful. Sometimes, when the harvest was too plentiful, they imposed on the missionaries by letting the word slip out that on such a day there would be a killing and a barbecue.