Frances vs French - What's the difference?

frances | french |


As a proper noun frances

is (male given name).

As a verb french is

to prepare food by cutting it into strips.

frances

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl), from (etyl) Franceise, feminine form of Franceis, from .

Proper noun

(en proper noun)
  • , feminine form of Francis.
  • * c.1590 William Shakespeare: Love's Labour's Lost : Act III, Scene I:
  • Armado . Sirrah Costard, I will enfranchise thee.
    Costard''. O! marry me to one Frances : I smell some ''l'envoy , some goose, in this.
  • * 1883 , Heart and Science , Chatto and Windus, page 227:
  • "My name is Frances'. Don't call me Fanny!" "Why not?" "Because it's too absurd to be endured! What does the mere sound of Fanny suggest? A flirting dancing creature - plump and fair, and playful and pretty! - - - Call me ' Frances - a man's name, with only the difference between an i and an e. No sentiment in it, hard, like me."
  • * 1961 , Owls Do Cry , ISBN 072510029X, page 97:
  • My other sisters had interesting names. There was Francie, that was Frances , and though she wore slacks and my father seemed angry with her, I thought she was some relation to Saint Francis, who, I believed, kept animals in his pocket and took them out and licked them, the way Francie licked a blackball or acid drop, for pure love.

    Etymology 2

    Proper noun

    (head)
  • * 1967 , Eric A. Nordlinger, The Working-class Tories , page 236:
  • The malaise of French politics has commonly been interpreted as a product of a deep-seated conflict between the ‘two Frances ’.
  • * 1998 , Shanny Peer, France on Display: Peasants, Provincials, and Folklore (ISBN 0791437108), page 2:
  • Although scholars have offered different chronologies and causalities for the move toward modernity, most have resolved the paradox of the two Frances by placing them in sequence: "diverse France gave way over time as modern centralized France gathered force."
  • * 2013 , Making Sense of the Secular: Critical Perspectives (ISBN 1136277218), page 48:
  • Was it the end of the long conflict between the two Frances ? Yes and no.

    french

    Proper noun

    (en proper noun)
  • A Romance language spoken primarily in France, Belgium, Switzerland, Quebec, Valle d'Aosta and many former French colonies.
  • * 1997 , Albert Valdman, French and Creole in Louisiana , page 29
  • Almost three quarters of the population 65 and older reported speaking French .
  • * 2004 , Jack Flam, Matisse and Picasso: The Story of Their Rivalry and Friendship , page 18
  • Although he would spend the rest of his life in France, Picasso never mastered the language, and during those early years he was especially self-conscious about how bad his French was.
  • (surname)
  • See also

    * (fr) * Language list

    Noun

  • People of France, collectively.
  • The French and the English have often been at war.
  • * 2002 , Jeremy Thornton, The French and Indian War , page 14
  • On the way, scouts reported that some French were heading toward them across the ice.
  • (informal) Vulgar language.
  • Pardon my French .

    Usage notes

    When used to refer collectively to people of France, the word French is preceded by the definite article or some other determiner.

    Derived terms

    * pardon my French

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • Of or relating to France.
  • the French border with Italy
  • Of or relating to the people or culture of France.
  • French customs
  • Of or relating to the .
  • French verbs

    Derived terms

    * French bean, french bean * French berry * French braid * French bread * French-Canadian * French casement * French chalk * French corner * French cowslip * French curl * French curve * French-cut * French defence, French defense * French dip * French door * French dressing, french dressing * French Equatorial Africa * French fact * French fake * French fits * French fries, french fries * French grey * French grip * French Guiana * French Guinea * French harp * French honeysuckle * French horn * French India * French Indochina * French kiss * French knickers * French knot * French lavender * French letter * French lilac * French loaf * French lock * French Louisiana * French maid * Frenchman * French Morocco * French mulberry * French mullet * French mustard * French onion soup * French pancake * French paradox * French pie * French plait * French polish * French Polynesia * French pox * French purple * French Quarter * French red * French Republican Calendar, French Revolutionary Calendar * French rice * French Riviera * French roast * French roll * French roof * French rose * French rye * French sash * French seam * French Somaliland * French sorrel * French Southern and Antarctic Lands * French spacing * French spinach * French stick * French-style * French Sudan * French tickler * French toast, french toast * French Togoland * French trumpet * French tub * * French twist * French vanilla * French West Africa * French window, french window * French wire * Frenchwoman * take French leave

    Verb

    (es)
  • To kiss (another person) while inserting one’s tongue into the other person's mouth.
  • * 1988 , Wanda Coleman, A War of Eyes and other stories , page 151
  • Tom frenched her full in the mouth.
  • To kiss in this manner.
  • * 1995 , Jack Womack, Random Acts of Senseless Violence , page 87
  • Even before I thought about what I was doing we Frenched and kissed with tongues.

    Alternative forms

    * french

    Synonyms

    * French kiss

    See also

    * Franco- * Gallic

    Statistics

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