Free vs Walk - What's the difference?

free | walk |


As verbs the difference between free and walk

is that free is to make free; set at liberty; release; rid of that which confines, limits, embarrasses, or oppresses while walk is to move on the feet by alternately setting each foot (or pair or group of feet, in the case of animals with four or more feet) forward, with at least one foot on the ground at all times compare run .

As nouns the difference between free and walk

is that free is (australian rules football|gaelic football) abbreviation of free kick while walk is a trip made by walking.

As a adjective free

is not imprisoned or enslaved.

As a adverb free

is without needing to pay.

free

English

Adjective

(er)
  • (label) Unconstrained.
  • *{{quote-book, year=1899, author=(Stephen Crane)
  • , title=, chapter=1 , passage=There was some laughter, and Roddle was left free to expand his ideas on the periodic visits of cowboys to the town. “Mason Rickets, he had ten big punkins a-sittin' in front of his store, an' them fellers from the Upside-down-F ranch shot 'em up […].”}}
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-08-10, volume=408, issue=8848, magazine=(The Economist), author=Schumpeter
  • , title=[http://www.economist.com/news/business/21583242-businesspeople-have-become-too-influential-government-cronies-and-capitols Cronies and capitols] , passage=Policing the relationship between government and business in a free society is difficult. Businesspeople have every right to lobby governments, and civil servants to take jobs in the private sector.}}
  • # Not imprisoned or enslaved.
  • # Unconstrained by timidity or distrust; unreserved; frank; communicative.
  • #* Milward
  • He was free only with a few.
  • # Generous; liberal.
  • # (label) Clear of offence or crime; guiltless; innocent.
  • #* (John Dryden) (1631-1700)
  • My hands are guilty, but my heart is free .
  • # Without obligations.
  • # Thrown open, or made accessible, to all; to be enjoyed without limitations; unrestricted; not obstructed, engrossed, or appropriated; open; said of a thing to be possessed or enjoyed.
  • #* (William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • Why, sir, I pray, are not the streets as free / For me as for you?
  • # Not arbitrary or despotic; assuring liberty; defending individual rights against encroachment by any person or class; instituted by a free people; said of a government, institutions, etc.
  • # (label) With no or only freedom-preserving limitations on distribution or modification.
  • # (label) Intended for release, as opposed to a checked version.
  • Obtainable without any payment.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-07-20, volume=408, issue=8845, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title=[http://www.economist.com/news/http://www.economist.com/news/business/21582001-army-new-online-courses-scaring-wits-out-traditional-universities-can-they The attack of the MOOCs] , passage=Since the launch early last year of […] two Silicon Valley start-ups offering free education through MOOCs, massive open online courses, the ivory towers of academia have been shaken to their foundations. University brands built in some cases over centuries have been forced to contemplate the possibility that information technology will rapidly make their existing business model obsolete.}}
  • # Obtainable without additional payment, as a bonus given when paying for something else.
  • (label) Unconstrained.
  • # (label) Unconstrained by relators.
  • # Unconstrained by quantifiers.
  • # (label) Of identifiers, not bound.
  • # That can be used by itself, unattached to another morpheme.
  • (label) Unconstrained.
  • # Unobstructed, without blockages.
  • # Unattached or uncombined.
  • # Not currently in use; not taken; unoccupied.
  • # Not attached; loose.
  • #*
  • Furthermore, the free anterior margin of the lobule is arched toward the lobe and is often involute
  • Without; not containing (what is specified); exempt; clear; liberated.
  • * (w) (1635?-1715)
  • princes declaring themselves free from the obligations of their treaties
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=4 , passage=One morning I had been driven to the precarious refuge afforded by the steps of the inn, after rejecting offers from the Celebrity to join him in a variety of amusements. But even here I was not free from interruption, for he was seated on a horse-block below me, playing with a fox terrier.}}
  • (label) Ready; eager; acting without spurring or whipping; spirited.
  • (label) Invested with a particular freedom or franchise; enjoying certain immunities or privileges; admitted to special rights; followed by of .
  • * (John Dryden) (1631-1700)
  • He therefore makes all birds, of every sect, / Free of his farm.
  • Certain or honourable; the opposite of base .
  • (Burrill)
  • (label) Privileged or individual; the opposite of common .
  • (Burrill)

    Synonyms

    * (obtainable without payment) free of charge, gratis * (unconstrained) unconstrained, unfettered, unhindered * (unobstructed) clear, unobstructed * libre * (without) without * unbound

    Antonyms

    * (not imprisoned or enslaved) bound, enslaved, imprisoned * (unconstrained) constrained, restricted * bound * (unobstructed) blocked, obstructed * bound * proprietary software

    Derived terms

    * -free * free Abelian group, free abelian group * free algebra * free and clear * free and easy * free as a bird * freeball * freebooter * free fall * free group * freelance * freeloader * free lunch * freely * free market * free marketeer * Freemason * free module * free object * free of charge * free rein * free ride * free rider * free semigroup * free speech * free spirit * free-spoken * free-thinker * free time * free variable * free vote * freeware * freeway * freewheel * free will * unfree

    Adverb

    (en adverb)
  • Without needing to pay.
  • I got this bike free .
  • (obsolete) Freely; willingly.
  • * Shakespeare
  • I as free forgive you / As I would be forgiven.

    Synonyms

    * for free, for nothing

    Verb

    (d)
  • To make free; set at liberty; release; rid of that which confines, limits, embarrasses, or oppresses.
  • Hyponyms

    * emancipate * liberate * manumit * release * unchain * unfetter

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (Australian rules football, Gaelic football) Abbreviation of free kick.
  • * 2006 , [http://footballlegends.org/daryn_cresswell.htm]:
  • Whether deserved or not, the free' gave Cresswell the chance to cover himself in glory with a shot on goal after the siren.
  • free transfer
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2011 , date=September 21 , author=Sam Lyon , title=Man City 2 - 0 Birmingham , work=BBC Sport , url=http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport2/hi/football/14910208.stm , page= , passage=Hargreaves, who left Manchester United on a free during the summer, drilled a 22-yard beauty to open the scoring.}}
  • (hurling) The usual means of restarting play after a foul is committed, where the non-offending team restarts from where the foul was committed.
  • Usage notes

    *

    walk

    English

    (walk)

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (lb) To move on the feet by alternately setting each foot (or pair or group of feet, in the case of animals with four or more feet) forward, with at least one foot on the ground at all times. Compare .
  • :
  • *
  • *:Athelstan Arundel walked home all the way, foaming and raging.His mother lived at Pembridge Square, which is four good measured miles from Lincoln's Inn. He walked the whole way, walking through crowds, and under the noses of dray-horses, carriage-horses, and cart-horses, without taking the least notice of them.
  • *, chapter=15
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=Edward Churchill still attended to his work in a hopeless mechanical manner like a sleep-walker who walks safely on a well-known round. But his Roman collar galled him, his cossack stifled him, his biretta was as uncomfortable as a merry-andrew's cap and bells.}}
  • To "walk free", i.e. to win, or avoid, a criminal court case, particularly when actually guilty.
  • :
  • Of an object, to be stolen.
  • :
  • To walk off the field, as if given out, after the fielding side appeals and before the umpire has ruled; done as a matter of sportsmanship when the batsman believes he is out.
  • (lb) To travel (a distance) by walking.
  • :
  • *
  • *:Athelstan Arundel walked' home all the way, foaming and raging.His mother lived at Pembridge Square, which is four good measured miles from Lincoln's Inn. He ' walked the whole way, walking through crowds, and under the noses of dray-horses, carriage-horses, and cart-horses, without taking the least notice of them.
  • (lb) To take for a walk or accompany on a walk.
  • :
  • *(William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • *:I will rather trusta thief to walk my ambling gelding.
  • To allow a batter to reach base by pitching four balls.
  • (lb) To move something by shifting between two positions, as if it were walking.
  • :
  • (lb) To full; to beat cloth to give it the consistency of felt.
  • (lb) To traverse by walking (or analogous gradual movement).
  • :
  • To leave, resign.
  • :
  • *(Edmund Spenser) (c.1552–1599)
  • *:He will make their cows and garrans to walk .
  • (lb) To push (a vehicle) alongside oneself as one walks.
  • *1994 , John Forester, Bicycle Transportation: A Handbook for Cycling Transportation Engineers , MIT Press, p.245:
  • *:The county had a successful defense only because the judge kept telling the jury at every chance that the cyclist should have walked his bicycle like a pedestrian.
  • To behave; to pursue a course of life; to conduct oneself.
  • *(Jeremy Taylor) (1613–1677)
  • *:We walk' perversely with God, and he will ' walk crookedly toward us.
  • To be stirring; to be abroad; to go restlessly about; said of things or persons expected to remain quiet, such as a sleeping person, or the spirit of a dead person.
  • *(Hugh Latimer) (c.1485-1555)
  • *:I heard a pen walking in the chimney behind the cloth.
  • (lb) To be in motion; to act; to move.
  • *(Edmund Spenser) (c.1552–1599)
  • *:Her tongue did walk in foul reproach.
  • *(William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • *:I have heard, but not believed, the spirits of the dead / May walk again.
  • *(Ben Jonson) (1572-1637)
  • *:Do you think I'd walk in any plot?
  • Conjugation

    (en-conj-simple)

    Synonyms

    * (move upon two feet) - See also * be acquitted, get off, go free * (be stolen) be/get stolen; (British) be/get nicked, be/get pinched * (beat cloth) full, waulk (obsolete)

    Derived terms

    * walkathon * walker * Walker * walkies * walk away from * walk away with * walk in * walk in circles * walk into * walk it * walk it off * walk like an Egyptian * walk off * walk off with * walk on * walk on the wild side * walk out * walk over * walk through * walkie-talkie * walkman * Walkman * walkover * walk tall * walk the beat * walk the walk

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A trip made by walking.
  • I take a walk every morning
  • A distance walked.
  • It’s a long walk from my house to the library
  • (sports) An Olympic Games track event requiring that the heel of the leading foot touch the ground before the toe of the trailing foot leaves the ground.
  • A manner of walking; a person's style of walking.
  • The Ministry of Silly Walks is underfunded this year
  • A path, sidewalk/pavement or other maintained place on which to walk. Compare trail .
  • (baseball) An award of first base to a batter following four balls being thrown by the pitcher; known in the rules as a "base on balls".
  • The pitcher now has two walks in this inning alone

    Synonyms

    * (trip made by walking) stroll (slow walk), hike (long walk), trek (long walk) * (distance walked) hike (if long), trek (if long) * (manner of walking) gait * (path) footpath, path, (British) pavement, (US) sidewalk

    Derived terms

    * cakewalk * catwalk * farmer's walk * intentional walk * perp walk * race walk * random walk * sidewalk * space walk / spacewalk * sponsored walk * walk in the park * walk in the snow * walk on the wild side * walk policy * whistle walk