System vs Foundation - What's the difference?

system | foundation |


As nouns the difference between system and foundation

is that system is system while foundation is the act of founding, fixing, establishing, or beginning to erect.

system

English

(wikipedia system)

Noun

(en noun)
  • A collection of organized things; a whole composed of relationships among its members.
  • * '>citation
  • # (label) A set of equations involving the same , which are to be solved simultaneously.
  • # (medicine) The body organs that contribute to a vegetative function.
  • # (label) A set of staffs that indicate instruments or sounds that are to be played simultaneously.
  • A method or way of organizing or planning.
  • *
  • As a political system democracy seems to me extraordinarily foolish, but I would not go out of my way to protest against it. My servant is, so far as I am concerned, welcome to as many votes as he can get. I would very gladly make mine over to him if I could.
  • * '>citation
  • # (derogatory) In the system : the mainstream culture, elites, or government of a state, or a combination of them, seen as oppressive to the individual.
  • #*
  • Synonyms

    * apparatus, arrangement, complex, composition, logistics, machinery, organization, set up, synthesis, structure

    Derived terms

    * binary system * biological system * closed system * complex adaptive system * complex system * computer system * conceptual system * Copernican system * cultural system * dynamical system * economic system * ecosystem * expert system * formal system * global positioning system * information system * isolated system * legal system * metric system * multi-agent system * nervous system * open system * operating system * out of one's system * physical system * political system * Ptolemaic system * sensory system * social system * sociotechnical system theory * solar system * subsystem * system dynamics * systems art * systems biology * systems categories * systems ecology * systems engineering * systems of measurement * systems science * systems theory

    See also

    * network

    Statistics

    * ----

    foundation

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • The act of founding, fixing, establishing, or beginning to erect.
  • That upon which anything is founded; that on which anything stands, and by which it is supported; the lowest and supporting layer of a superstructure; groundwork; basis; underbuilding.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-07-20, volume=408, issue=8845, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= The attack of the MOOCs , passage=Since the launch early last year of […] two Silicon Valley start-ups offering free education through MOOCs, massive open online courses, the ivory towers of academia have been shaken to their foundations . University brands built in some cases over centuries have been forced to contemplate the possibility that information technology will rapidly make their existing business model obsolete.}}
  • (card games) In solitaire or patience games, one of the piles of cards that the player attempts to build, usually holding all cards of a suit in ascending order.
  • (architecture) The lowest and supporting part or member of a wall, including the base course and footing courses; in a frame house, the whole substructure of masonry.
  • * {{quote-news, year=2012, date=May 20, author=Nathan Rabin, work=The Onion AV Club
  • , title= TV: Review: THE SIMPSONS (CLASSIC): “Marge Gets A Job” (season 4, episode 7; originally aired 11/05/1992) , passage=“Marge Gets A Job” opens with the foundation of the Simpson house tilting perilously to one side, making the family homestead look like the suburban equivalent of the Leaning Tower Of Pisa. }}
  • A donation or legacy appropriated to support a charitable institution, and constituting a permanent fund; endowment.
  • That which is founded, or established by endowment; an endowed institution or charity.
  • (cosmetics) Cosmetic cream roughly skin-colored, designed to make the face appear uniform in color and texture.
  • A basis for social bodies or intellectual disciplines.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-08-03, volume=408, issue=8847, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= Boundary problems , passage=Economics is a messy discipline: too fluid to be a science, too rigorous to be an art. Perhaps it is fitting that economists’ most-used metric, gross domestic product (GDP), is a tangle too.

    Derived terms

    * foundation stone

    Synonyms

    *(act of founding) establishment *groundwall

    Antonyms

    *(act of founding) abolition, dissolution, ruination