What is the difference between foundation and base?

foundation | base |


In context|architecture|lang=en terms the difference between foundation and base

is that foundation is (architecture) the lowest and supporting part or member of a wall, including the base course and footing courses; in a frame house, the whole substructure of masonry while base is (architecture) the lowermost part of a column, between the shaft and the pedestal or pavement.

As nouns the difference between foundation and base

is that foundation is the act of founding, fixing, establishing, or beginning to erect while base is something from which other things extend; a foundation or base can be .

As a verb base is

to give as its foundation or starting point; to lay the foundation of.

As a adjective base is

(obsolete) low in height; short.

foundation

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • The act of founding, fixing, establishing, or beginning to erect.
  • That upon which anything is founded; that on which anything stands, and by which it is supported; the lowest and supporting layer of a superstructure; groundwork; basis; underbuilding.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-07-20, volume=408, issue=8845, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= The attack of the MOOCs , passage=Since the launch early last year of […] two Silicon Valley start-ups offering free education through MOOCs, massive open online courses, the ivory towers of academia have been shaken to their foundations . University brands built in some cases over centuries have been forced to contemplate the possibility that information technology will rapidly make their existing business model obsolete.}}
  • (card games) In solitaire or patience games, one of the piles of cards that the player attempts to build, usually holding all cards of a suit in ascending order.
  • (architecture) The lowest and supporting part or member of a wall, including the base course and footing courses; in a frame house, the whole substructure of masonry.
  • * {{quote-news, year=2012, date=May 20, author=Nathan Rabin, work=The Onion AV Club
  • , title= TV: Review: THE SIMPSONS (CLASSIC): “Marge Gets A Job” (season 4, episode 7; originally aired 11/05/1992) , passage=“Marge Gets A Job” opens with the foundation of the Simpson house tilting perilously to one side, making the family homestead look like the suburban equivalent of the Leaning Tower Of Pisa. }}
  • A donation or legacy appropriated to support a charitable institution, and constituting a permanent fund; endowment.
  • That which is founded, or established by endowment; an endowed institution or charity.
  • (cosmetics) Cosmetic cream roughly skin-colored, designed to make the face appear uniform in color and texture.
  • A basis for social bodies or intellectual disciplines.
  • * {{quote-magazine, date=2013-08-03, volume=408, issue=8847, magazine=(The Economist)
  • , title= Boundary problems , passage=Economics is a messy discipline: too fluid to be a science, too rigorous to be an art. Perhaps it is fitting that economists’ most-used metric, gross domestic product (GDP), is a tangle too.

    Derived terms

    * foundation stone

    Synonyms

    *(act of founding) establishment *groundwall

    Antonyms

    *(act of founding) abolition, dissolution, ruination

    base

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) base, from (etyl) basis, from (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Something from which other things extend; a foundation.
  • # A supporting, lower or bottom component of a structure or object.
  • #* {{quote-book, year=1963, author=(Margery Allingham), title=(The China Governess)
  • , chapter=14 citation , passage=Nanny Broome was looking up at the outer wall. Just under the ceiling there were three lunette windows, heavily barred and blacked out in the normal way by centuries of grime. Their bases were on a level with the pavement outside, a narrow way which was several feet lower than the road behind the house.}}
  • The starting point of a logical deduction or thought; basis.
  • A permanent structure for housing military personnel and material.
  • The place where decisions for an organization are made; headquarters.
  • (cooking, painting, pharmacy) A basic but essential component or ingredient.
  • A substance used as a mordant in dyeing.
  • (Ure)
  • (lb) Foundation: a cosmetic cream to make the face appear uniform.
  • (chemistry) Any of a class of generally water-soluble compounds, having bitter taste, that turn red litmus blue, and react with acids to form salts.
  • Important areas in games and sports.
  • # A safe zone in the children's games of tag and hide-and-go-seek.
  • # (baseball) One of the three places that a runner can stand without being subject to being tagged out.
  • (architecture) The lowermost part of a column, between the shaft and the pedestal or pavement.
  • (biology, biochemistry) A nucleotide's nucleobase in the context of a DNA or RNA biopolymer.
  • (botany) The end of a leaf, petal or similar organ where it is attached to its support.
  • (electronics) The name of the controlling terminal of a bipolar transistor (BJT).
  • (geometry) The lowest side of a in a triangle or other polygon, or the lowest face of a cone, pyramid or other polyhedron laid flat.
  • (heraldiccharge) The lowest third of a shield or escutcheon.
  • (mathematics) A number raised to the power of an exponent.
  • The logarithm to base 2 of 8 is 3.
  • (mathematics) Alternative to radix.
  • (topology) The set of sets from which a topology is generated.
  • (topology) A topological space, looked at in relation to one of its covering spaces, fibrations, or bundles.
  • (cheerleading) A cheerleader who stays on the ground.
  • (linguistics) A morpheme (or morphemes) that serves as a basic foundation on which affixes can be attached.
  • (music)
  • * Dryden
  • The trebles squeak for fear, the bases roar.
  • (military, historical) The smallest kind of cannon.
  • (heraldry) The lower part of the field. See escutcheon.
  • The housing of a horse.
  • (historical, in the plural) A kind of skirt (often of velvet or brocade, but sometimes of mailed armour) which hung from the middle to about the knees, or lower.
  • (obsolete) The lower part of a robe or petticoat.
  • (obsolete) An apron.
  • * Marston
  • bakers in their linen bases
  • A line in a survey which, being accurately determined in length and position, serves as the origin from which to compute the distances and positions of any points or objects connected with it by a system of triangles.
  • (Lyman)
    Synonyms
    * (chemical compound that will neutralize an acid) alkali
    Antonyms
    * (chemical compound that will neutralize an acid) acid * (end of a leaf) apex
    Derived terms
    * air base * base bag * baseball * baseband * baseboard * base box * base-burner * base camp * base censor * base coat * base color/base colour * base course * base exchange * base hospital * baseless * baselevel * baseline * basely * base load * baseman * basement * base molding/base moulding * base out * base over apex * baseperson * baseplate * base-player * base-playing * base point * base port * base radio * base rate * base ring * baserunner/base runner * base-running/baserunning * base ship * base shoot * base squadron * base station * base-stealer * base-stealing * base substitution * base table * base unit * base wallah * basewoman * counterbase * cover one's bases * database * debase * first base * freebase * home base * knowledge base * leuco-base * make first base * moonbase * off base * on base * power base * prisoner's base, prisoners' base * second base * subbase * surbase * third base * wheelbase

    Verb

    (bas)
  • To give as its foundation or starting point; to lay the foundation of.
  • *
  • Firstly, I continue to base most species treatments on personally collected material, rather than on herbarium plants.
  • To be located (at a particular place).
  • Derived terms
    * -based * base on

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl) bas, from .

    Adjective

    (en-adj)
  • (obsolete) Low in height; short.
  • base shrubs
    (Shakespeare)
  • Low in place or position.
  • (Shakespeare)
  • (obsolete) Of low value or degree.
  • * , II.3:
  • If thou livest in paine and sorrow, thy base courage is the cause of it, To die there wanteth but will.
  • (archaic) Of low social standing or rank; vulgar, common.
  • * Francis Bacon
  • a pleasant and base swain
  • Morally reprehensible, immoral; cowardly.
  • * Robynson (More's Utopia)
  • a cruel act of a base and a cowardish mind
  • * Milton
  • base ingratitude
  • * {{quote-book, year=1905, author=
  • , title= , chapter=1 citation , passage=“Mrs. Yule's chagrin and horror at what she called her son's base ingratitude knew no bounds ; at first it was even thought that she would never get over it.
  • Inferior; unworthy, of poor quality.
  • Designating those metals which are not classed as (precious) or (noble).
  • Alloyed with inferior metal; debased.
  • base''' coin;  '''base bullion
  • (obsolete) Of illegitimate birth; bastard.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Why bastard? wherefore base ?
  • Not classical or correct.
  • base Latin
    (Fuller)
  • the base tone of a violin
  • (legal) Not held by honourable service.
  • A base''' estate is one held by services not honourable, or held by villenage. Such a tenure is called '''base''', or low, and the tenant is a '''base tenant.
    Usage notes
    * Said of fellows, motives, occupations, etc.
    Synonyms
    * bad, vile, malicious, destructive, reprehensible, knavish, evil
    Antonyms
    * likeable * desirable * admirable * noble
    Derived terms
    * base-born * base-bred * base coin * base estate * base fee * basely * base metal * base-minded * baseness * base-spirited * base tenant * base tenure * base-witted

    Etymology 3

    Probably a specific use of Etymology 1, above; perhaps also a development of the plural of (bar).

    Noun

    (-)
  • * Shakespeare
  • to run the country base
  • * 1596 , (Edmund Spenser), The Faerie Queene , V.8:
  • So ran they all, as they had bene at bace , / They being chased that did others chase.

    Etymology 4

    Variant forms.

    Acronym

    (Acronym) (head)
  • Derived terms
    * base jumper * base jumping

    See also

    * (wikipedia "base") *

    Anagrams

    * * 1000 English basic words ----