Forward vs Walk - What's the difference?

forward | walk |


As nouns the difference between forward and walk

is that forward is (dialectal|or|obsolete) agreement; covenant or forward can be (rugby) one of the eight players (comprising two props, one hooker, two locks, two flankers and one number eight, collectively known as the pack) whose primary task is to gain and maintain possession of the ball (compare back) while walk is a trip made by walking.

As verbs the difference between forward and walk

is that forward is to advance, promote while walk is to move on the feet by alternately setting each foot (or pair or group of feet, in the case of animals with four or more feet) forward, with at least one foot on the ground at all times compare run .

As a adjective forward

is toward the front or at the front.

As a adverb forward

is towards the front or from the front.

forward

English

Alternative forms

* (l)

Etymology 1

From (etyl), from (etyl) . More at (l), (l).

Noun

(en noun)
  • (dialectal, or, obsolete) Agreement; covenant.
  • Etymology 2

    From (etyl) foreward, from (etyl) .

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • Toward the front or at the front.
  • The fire was confined to the forward portion of the store.
    the forward''' gun in a ship, or the '''forward ship in a fleet
  • Without customary restraint or modesty.
  • I thought his suggestion that we move in together was rather forward .
    1999:' ''"Would you think it '''forward of me to kiss you?" asked Tristran.'' — Neil Gaiman, ''Stardust , pg. 44 (2001 Perennial paperback edition).
  • (finance) Expected in the future.
  • The stock price is currently 12 times forward earnings.
  • Ready; prompt; strongly inclined; in a bad sense, overready or hasty.
  • * Bible, Gal. ii. 10
  • Only they would that we should remember the poor; the same which I also was forward to do.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Nor do we find him forward to be sounded.
  • Advanced beyond the usual degree; advanced for the season.
  • The grass is forward''', or '''forward''' for the season. We have a '''forward spring.
  • * Shakespeare
  • The most forward bud / Is eaten by the canker ere it blow.
    Usage notes
    * The superlative forwardmost can be used for the "toward or at the front" sense. There does not appear to be a "forwardmore".
    Synonyms
    * (at the front) anterior, front * (without customary restraint) bold, fresh, impertinent * (expected in the future) forecast, predicted
    Antonyms
    * (at the front) back, posterior, rear * (without customary restraint) restrained * (expected in the future) past

    Adverb

    (further)
  • Towards the front or from the front.
  • *
  • A great bargain also had been the excellent Axminster carpet which covered the floor; as, again, the arm-chair in which Bunting now sat forward , staring into the dull, small fire. In fact, that arm-chair had been an extravagance of Mrs. Bunting. She had wanted her husband to be comfortable after the day's work was done, and she had paid thirty-seven shillings for the chair.
  • In the usual direction of travel.
  • Into the future.
  • *
  • , title=(The Celebrity), chapter=8 , passage=The humor of my proposition appealed more strongly to Miss Trevor than I had looked for, and from that time forward she became her old self again; for, even after she had conquered her love for the Celebrity, the mortification of having been jilted by him remained.}}
    Synonyms
    * (towards the front) forwards * (in the usual direction of travel) ahead, forth, on, onward, onwards * (into the future) forth, forwards, hereon, on, onward, onwards
    Antonyms
    * (towards the front) back, backward, backwards, rearwards * (in the usual direction of travel) back, backward, backwards, rearwards, in reverse * (in the future) backward, backwards, into the past
    Derived terms
    * (adverb) * look forward * look forward to

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To advance, promote.
  • * 1941 , (W Somerset Maugham), Up at the Villa , Vintage 2004, p. 26:
  • Mary had a suspicion that this plan had been arranged beforehand, for she knew how the lewd old woman loved to forward love affairs […].
  • To send (a letter, email etc.) to a third party.
  • I'll be glad to forward your mail to you while you're gone.
    Synonyms
    * pass on
    Derived terms
    * fast forward * forwarding address * freight forwarder

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (rugby) one of the eight players (comprising two props, one hooker, two locks, two flankers and one number eight, collectively known as the pack) whose primary task is to gain and maintain possession of the ball (compare back).
  • (soccer) A player on a team in football (soccer) in the row nearest to the opposing team's goal, who are therefore principally responsible for scoring goals.
  • (ice hockey) An umbrella term for a centre or winger in ice hockey.
  • (basketball) The small forward or power forward position; two frontcourt positions that are taller than guards but shorter than centers.
  • (nautical) The front part of a vessel.
  • (Internet) An e-mail message that is forwarded to another recipient or recipients; an electronic chain letter.
  • * 2004 , Tamara Stevens, What Is Snail Mail?: The Lost Art of Letterwriting (page 27)
  • When you receive your new pen-pal's email address, do not automatically put it in your address book and use the email Addy to send 'forwards' to. Not every pen pal likes 'forwards', especially jokes and meaningless emails.
  • * 2009 , Joli Ballew, Windows 7 for the Over 50s in Simple Steps
  • This method attaches the files to a new email, which is fine if you want to create a new email. The only problem with this is that it doesn't work if you'd rather send forwards or replies.
  • Synonyms
    * (soccer position) attacker, centre forward, striker
    See also
    * foreword, meaning a preface or introduction

    Statistics

    *

    Anagrams

    *

    walk

    English

    (walk)

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • (lb) To move on the feet by alternately setting each foot (or pair or group of feet, in the case of animals with four or more feet) forward, with at least one foot on the ground at all times. Compare .
  • :
  • *
  • *:Athelstan Arundel walked home all the way, foaming and raging.His mother lived at Pembridge Square, which is four good measured miles from Lincoln's Inn. He walked the whole way, walking through crowds, and under the noses of dray-horses, carriage-horses, and cart-horses, without taking the least notice of them.
  • *, chapter=15
  • , title= The Mirror and the Lamp , passage=Edward Churchill still attended to his work in a hopeless mechanical manner like a sleep-walker who walks safely on a well-known round. But his Roman collar galled him, his cossack stifled him, his biretta was as uncomfortable as a merry-andrew's cap and bells.}}
  • To "walk free", i.e. to win, or avoid, a criminal court case, particularly when actually guilty.
  • :
  • Of an object, to be stolen.
  • :
  • To walk off the field, as if given out, after the fielding side appeals and before the umpire has ruled; done as a matter of sportsmanship when the batsman believes he is out.
  • (lb) To travel (a distance) by walking.
  • :
  • *
  • *:Athelstan Arundel walked' home all the way, foaming and raging.His mother lived at Pembridge Square, which is four good measured miles from Lincoln's Inn. He ' walked the whole way, walking through crowds, and under the noses of dray-horses, carriage-horses, and cart-horses, without taking the least notice of them.
  • (lb) To take for a walk or accompany on a walk.
  • :
  • *(William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • *:I will rather trusta thief to walk my ambling gelding.
  • To allow a batter to reach base by pitching four balls.
  • (lb) To move something by shifting between two positions, as if it were walking.
  • :
  • (lb) To full; to beat cloth to give it the consistency of felt.
  • (lb) To traverse by walking (or analogous gradual movement).
  • :
  • To leave, resign.
  • :
  • *(Edmund Spenser) (c.1552–1599)
  • *:He will make their cows and garrans to walk .
  • (lb) To push (a vehicle) alongside oneself as one walks.
  • *1994 , John Forester, Bicycle Transportation: A Handbook for Cycling Transportation Engineers , MIT Press, p.245:
  • *:The county had a successful defense only because the judge kept telling the jury at every chance that the cyclist should have walked his bicycle like a pedestrian.
  • To behave; to pursue a course of life; to conduct oneself.
  • *(Jeremy Taylor) (1613–1677)
  • *:We walk' perversely with God, and he will ' walk crookedly toward us.
  • To be stirring; to be abroad; to go restlessly about; said of things or persons expected to remain quiet, such as a sleeping person, or the spirit of a dead person.
  • *(Hugh Latimer) (c.1485-1555)
  • *:I heard a pen walking in the chimney behind the cloth.
  • (lb) To be in motion; to act; to move.
  • *(Edmund Spenser) (c.1552–1599)
  • *:Her tongue did walk in foul reproach.
  • *(William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • *:I have heard, but not believed, the spirits of the dead / May walk again.
  • *(Ben Jonson) (1572-1637)
  • *:Do you think I'd walk in any plot?
  • Conjugation

    (en-conj-simple)

    Synonyms

    * (move upon two feet) - See also * be acquitted, get off, go free * (be stolen) be/get stolen; (British) be/get nicked, be/get pinched * (beat cloth) full, waulk (obsolete)

    Derived terms

    * walkathon * walker * Walker * walkies * walk away from * walk away with * walk in * walk in circles * walk into * walk it * walk it off * walk like an Egyptian * walk off * walk off with * walk on * walk on the wild side * walk out * walk over * walk through * walkie-talkie * walkman * Walkman * walkover * walk tall * walk the beat * walk the walk

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A trip made by walking.
  • I take a walk every morning
  • A distance walked.
  • It’s a long walk from my house to the library
  • (sports) An Olympic Games track event requiring that the heel of the leading foot touch the ground before the toe of the trailing foot leaves the ground.
  • A manner of walking; a person's style of walking.
  • The Ministry of Silly Walks is underfunded this year
  • A path, sidewalk/pavement or other maintained place on which to walk. Compare trail .
  • (baseball) An award of first base to a batter following four balls being thrown by the pitcher; known in the rules as a "base on balls".
  • The pitcher now has two walks in this inning alone

    Synonyms

    * (trip made by walking) stroll (slow walk), hike (long walk), trek (long walk) * (distance walked) hike (if long), trek (if long) * (manner of walking) gait * (path) footpath, path, (British) pavement, (US) sidewalk

    Derived terms

    * cakewalk * catwalk * farmer's walk * intentional walk * perp walk * race walk * random walk * sidewalk * space walk / spacewalk * sponsored walk * walk in the park * walk in the snow * walk on the wild side * walk policy * whistle walk