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Order vs Force - What's the difference?

order | force |

As nouns the difference between order and force

is that order is , command while force is force.

order

English

(wikipedia order)

Alternative forms

* ordre (obsolete)

Noun

  • (uncountable) Arrangement, disposition, sequence.
  • (uncountable) The state of being well arranged.
  • The house is in order'''; the machinery is out of '''order .
  • Conformity with law or decorum; freedom from disturbance; general tranquillity; public quiet.
  • to preserve order in a community or an assembly
  • (countable) A command.
  • * {{quote-book, year=1907, author=
  • , title=The Dust of Conflict , chapter=30 citation , passage=It was by his order the shattered leading company flung itself into the houses when the Sin Verguenza were met by an enfilading volley as they reeled into the calle.}}
  • (countable) A request for some product or service; a commission to purchase, sell, or supply goods.
  • * {{quote-magazine, title=An internet of airborne things, date=2012-12-01, volume=405, issue=8813, page=3 (Technology Quarterly), magazine=(The Economist) citation
  • , passage=A farmer could place an order for a new tractor part by text message and pay for it by mobile money-transfer.}}
  • (countable) A group of religious adherents, especially monks or nuns, set apart within their religion by adherence to a particular rule or set of principles; as, the Jesuit Order.
  • (countable) An association of knights; as, the Order of the Garter, the Order of the Bath.
  • any group of people with common interests.
  • (countable) A decoration, awarded by a government, a dynastic house, or a religious body to an individual, usually for distinguished service to a nation or to humanity.
  • (countable, biology, taxonomy) A rank in the classification of organisms, below class and above family; a taxon at that rank.
  • * {{quote-magazine, year=2013, month=May-June, author= Katie L. Burke
  • , title= In the News , volume=101, issue=3, page=193, magazine=(American Scientist) , passage=Bats host many high-profile viruses that can infect humans, including severe acute respiratory syndrome and Ebola. A recent study explored the ecological variables that may contribute to bats’ propensity to harbor such zoonotic diseases by comparing them with another order of common reservoir hosts: rodents.}}
  • A number of things or persons arranged in a fixed or suitable place, or relative position; a rank; a row; a grade; especially, a rank or class in society; a distinct character, kind, or sort.
  • the higher or lower orders of society
    talent of a high order
  • * Jeremy Taylor
  • They are in equal order to their several ends.
  • * Granville
  • Various orders various ensigns bear.
  • * Hawthorne
  • which, to his order of mind, must have seemed little short of crime.
  • An ecclesiastical grade or rank, as of deacon, priest, or bishop; the office of the Christian ministry; often used in the plural.
  • to take orders''', or to take '''holy orders , that is, to enter some grade of the ministry
  • (architecture) The disposition of a column and its component parts, and of the entablature resting upon it, in classical architecture; hence (as the column and entablature are the characteristic features of classical architecture) a style or manner of architectural designing.
  • (cricket) The sequence in which a side’s batsmen bat; the batting order.
  • (electronics) a power of polynomial function in an electronic circuit’s block, such as a filter, an amplifier, etc.
  • * a 3-stage cascade of a 2nd-order bandpass Butterworth filter.
  • (chemistry) The overall power of the rate law of a chemical reaction, expressed as a polynomial function of concentrations of reactants and products.
  • (mathematics) The cardinality, or number of elements in a set or related structure.
  • (graph theory) The number of vertices in a graph.
  • (order theory) A partially ordered set.
  • (order theory) The relation on a partially ordered set that determines that it in fact a partially ordered set.
  • (mathematics) The sum of the exponents on the variables in a monomial, or the highest such among all monomials in a polynomial.
  • Quotations

    * 1611 — 1:1 *: Forasmuch as many have taken in hand to set forth in order a declaration of those things which are most surely believed among us... * Donald Knuth. Volume 3: ''Sorting and Searching, Addison-Wesley, 1973, chapter 8: *: Since only two of our tape drives were in working order', I was '''ordered''' to '''order''' more tape units in short '''order''', in '''order''' to '''order''' the data several ' orders of magnitude faster.

    Antonyms

    * chaos

    Derived terms

    * alphabetical order * antisocial behaviour order * Anton Piller order * apple-pie order * back-to-work order * bottom order * court order * doctor's orders * Doric order * executive order * first order stream * fraternal birth order * gagging order * Groceries Order * in order / in order to * in short order * infra-order * interim order * last orders * law-and-order * Mary Bell order * mendicant order * middle order * moral order * New World Order * on the order of * order in council * Order of Australia * order of magnitude * order of operations * order of precedence * order of the day * order stream * out of order * partial order * pecking order * place an order * put one's house in order * purchase order * religious order * restraining order * second order stream * short order * standing order * stop-loss order * superorder * tall order * third order stream * total order * well-order * working order * z-order

    See also

    *

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To set in some sort of order.
  • To arrange, set in proper order.
  • To issue a command to.
  • to order troops to advance
  • To request some product or service; to secure by placing an order.
  • to order groceries
  • To admit to holy orders; to ordain; to receive into the ranks of the ministry.
  • * Book of Common Prayer
  • persons presented to be ordered deacons
    Synonyms
    * (arrange into some sort of order) sort, rank

    Derived terms

    * just what the doctor ordered * made-to-order * mail-order * order of magnitude * order out * well-order

    Statistics

    *

    force

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) force, fors, forse, from (etyl) .

    Noun

    (wikipedia force)
  • Strength or energy of body or mind; active power; vigour; might; capacity of exercising an influence or producing an effect.
  • :
  • * (1800-1859)
  • *:He was, in the full force of the words, a good man.
  • Power exerted against will or consent; compulsory power; violence; coercion.
  • *(William Shakespeare), Henry VI, part II
  • *:which now they hold by force , and not by right
  • (lb) Anything that is able to make a big change in a person or thing.
  • A physical quantity that denotes ability to push, pull, twist or accelerate a body which is measured in a unit dimensioned in mass × distance/time² (ML/T²): SI: newton (N); CGS: dyne (dyn)
  • Something or anything that has the power to produce an effect upon something else.
  • *{{quote-magazine, date=2012-03, author=(Henry Petroski), volume=100, issue=2, page=112-3
  • , magazine=(American Scientist) , title= Opening Doors , passage=A doorknob of whatever roundish shape is effectively a continuum of levers, with the axis of the latching mechanism—known as the spindle—being the fulcrum about which the turning takes place. Applying a force tangential to the knob is essentially equivalent to applying one perpendicular to a radial line defining the lever.}}
  • (lb) A group that aims to attack, control, or constrain.
  • :
  • *(William Shakespeare), (Cymbeline)
  • *:Is Lucius general of the forces ?
  • *
  • *:"A fine man, that Dunwody, yonder," commented the young captain, as they parted, and as he turned to his prisoner. "We'll see him on in Washington some day. He is strengthening his forces now against Mr. Benton out there.."
  • *{{quote-news, year=2004, date=April 15, work=The Scotsman
  • , title= Morning swoop in hunt for Jodi's killer , passage=For Lothian and Borders Police, the early-morning raid had come at the end one of biggest investigations carried out by the force , which had originally presented a dossier of evidence on the murder of Jodi Jones to the Edinburgh procurator-fiscal, William Gallagher, on 25 November last year.}}
  • (lb) The ability to attack, control, or constrain.
  • :
  • (lb) A magic trick in which the outcome is known to the magician beforehand, especially one involving the apparent free choice of a card by another person.
  • (lb) Legal validity.
  • :
  • (lb) Either unlawful violence, as in a "forced entry ", or lawful compulsion.
  • Usage notes
    * Adjectives often applied to "force": military, cultural, economic, gravitational, electric, magnetic, strong, weak, positive, negative, attractive, repulsive, good, evil, dark, physical, muscular, spiritual, intellectual, mental, emotional, rotational, tremendous, huge.
    Derived terms
    (Terms derived from "force") * air force * antiforce * brute force * centripetal force * centrifugal force * Coulomb force * Coriolis force * come into force * force field * force multiplier * force to be reckoned with * fundamental force * police force * spent force * task force * workforce

    Verb

    (forc)
  • (lb) To violate (a woman); to rape.
  • *:
  • *:For yf ye were suche fyfty as ye be / ye were not able to make resystence ageynst this deuyl / here lyeth a duchesse deede the whiche was the fayrest of alle the world wyf to syre Howel / duc of Bretayne / he hath murthred her in forcynge her / and has slytte her vnto the nauyl
  • *, II.1:
  • *:a young woman not farre from mee had headlong cast her selfe out of a high window, with intent to kill herselfe, only to avoid the ravishment of a rascally-base souldier that lay in her house, who offered to force her.
  • *, Bk.XVIII, Ch.xxi:
  • *:And I pray you for my sake to force yourselff there, that men may speke you worshyp.
  • (lb) To compel (someone or something) (to) do something.
  • *
  • *:Captain Edward Carlisle; he could not tell what this prisoner might do. He cursed the fate which had assigned such a duty, cursed especially that fate which forced a gallant soldier to meet so superb a woman as this under handicap so hard.
  • *2011 , Tim Webb & Fiona Harvey, The Guardian , 23 March:
  • *:Housebuilders had warned that the higher costs involved would have forced them to build fewer homes and priced many homebuyers out of the market.
  • (lb) To constrain by force; to overcome the limitations or resistance of.
  • *, I.40:
  • *:Shall wee force the general law of nature, which in all living creatures under heaven is seene to tremble at paine?
  • (lb) To drive (something) by force, to propel (generally + prepositional phrase or adverb).
  • *(John Dryden) (1631-1700)
  • *:It stuck so fast, so deeply buried lay / That scarce the victor forced the steel away.
  • *(William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • *:to force the tyrant from his seat by war
  • *(John Webster) (c.1580-c.1634)
  • *:Ethelbert ordered that none should be forced into religion.
  • *2007 , (The Guardian) , 4 November:
  • *:In a groundbreaking move, the Pentagon is compensating servicemen seriously hurt when an American tank convoy forced them off the road.
  • (lb) To cause to occur (despite inertia, resistance etc.); to produce through force.
  • :
  • *2009 , "All things to Althingi", (The Economist) , 23 July:
  • *:The second problem is the economy, the shocking state of which has forced the decision to apply to the EU.
  • (lb) To forcibly open (a door, lock etc.).
  • :
  • To obtain or win by strength; to take by violence or struggle; specifically, to capture by assault; to storm, as a fortress.
  • To create an out by touching a base in advance of a runner who has no base to return to while in possession of a ball which has already touched the ground.
  • :
  • (lb) To compel (an adversary or partner) to trump a trick by leading a suit that he/she does not hold.
  • (lb) To put in force; to cause to be executed; to make binding; to enforce.
  • *(John Webster) (c.1580-c.1634)
  • *:What can the church force more?
  • (lb) To provide with forces; to reinforce; to strengthen by soldiers; to man; to garrison.
  • :(Shakespeare)
  • (lb) To allow the force of; to value; to care for.
  • *(William Shakespeare) (1564-1616)
  • *:For me, I force not argument a straw.
  • Derived terms
    * enforce * forceful * forcible

    See also

    * Imperial unit: foot pound * metric unit: newton * coerce: To control by force.

    Etymology 2

    From (etyl)

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (countable, Northern England) A waterfall or cascade.
  • * T. Gray
  • to see the falls or force of the river Kent

    Etymology 3

    See .

    Verb

    (forc)
  • To stuff; to lard; to farce.
  • * Shakespeare
  • Wit larded with malice, and malice forced with wit.

    Statistics

    *