Foolish vs Dotage - What's the difference?

foolish | dotage |


As an adjective foolish

is lacking good sense or judgement; unwise.

As a noun dotage is

decline in judgment and other cognitive functions, associated with aging; senility.

foolish

English

Adjective

(en-adj)
  • Lacking good sense or judgement; unwise.
  • :
  • *
  • *:As a political system democracy seems to me extraordinarily foolish , but I would not go out of my way to protest against it. My servant is, so far as I am concerned, welcome to as many votes as he can get. I would very gladly make mine over to him if I could.
  • Resembling or characteristic of a fool.
  • :
  • *(Aeschylus)
  • *:It is a profitable thing, if one is wise, to seem foolish .
  • Synonyms

    * absurd * idiotic * ridiculous * silly * unwise

    Antonyms

    * wise

    Derived terms

    * foolishness

    dotage

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Decline in judgment and other cognitive functions, associated with aging; senility.
  • * 1841 , , The Old Curiosity Shop , ch. 1,
  • "More care!" said the old man. . . . There were in his face marks of deep and anxious thought which convinced me that he could not be, as I had been at first inclined to suppose, in a state of dotage or imbecility.
  • Fondness or attentiveness, especially to an excessive degree.
  • * 1598 , , Much Ado About Nothing , act 2, sc. 3,
  • CLAUDIO: And she is exceeding wise.
    DON PEDRO: In every thing but in loving Benedick. . . . I would she had bestowed this dotage on me.
  • foolish utterance; drivel
  • The sapless dotages of old Paris and Salamanca. — Milton.

    Synonyms

    * (loss of mental acuity associated with aging) second childhood

    Anagrams

    * *