What is the difference between foolish and connotation?

foolish | connotation |


As a adjective foolish

is lacking good sense or judgement; unwise.

As a noun connotation is

a meaning of a word or phrase that is suggested or implied, as opposed to a denotation, or literal meaning a characteristic of words or phrases, or of the contexts that words and phrases are used in.

foolish

English

Adjective

(en-adj)
  • Lacking good sense or judgement; unwise.
  • :
  • *
  • *:As a political system democracy seems to me extraordinarily foolish , but I would not go out of my way to protest against it. My servant is, so far as I am concerned, welcome to as many votes as he can get. I would very gladly make mine over to him if I could.
  • Resembling or characteristic of a fool.
  • :
  • *(Aeschylus)
  • *:It is a profitable thing, if one is wise, to seem foolish .
  • Synonyms

    * absurd * idiotic * ridiculous * silly * unwise

    Antonyms

    * wise

    Derived terms

    * foolishness

    connotation

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A meaning of a word or phrase that is suggested or implied, as opposed to a denotation, or literal meaning. A characteristic of words or phrases, or of the contexts that words and phrases are used in.
  • The connotations of the phrase "you are a dog" are that you are physically unattractive or morally reprehensible, not that you are a canine.
  • A technical term in logic used by J. S. Mill and later logicians to refer to the attribute or aggregate of attributes connoted by a term, and contrasted with denotation .
  • The two expressions "the morning star" and "the evening star" have different connotations but the same denotation (i.e. the planet Venus).

    Antonyms

    * denotation

    Synonyms

    * intension

    References

    *