Folly vs Foolhardy - What's the difference?

folly | foolhardy |


As a noun folly

is .

As an adjective foolhardy is

marked by unthinking recklessness with disregard for danger; bold but rash; hotheaded.

folly

English

Noun

(follies)
  • .
  • This is a war of folly .
  • Thoughtless action resulting in tragic consequence.
  • The purchase of Alaska from Russia was termed Seward's folly.
  • A fanciful building built for purely ornamental reasons.
  • A luncheonette in the shape of a coffee cup is particularly conspicuous, as is intended of an architectural duck or folly .
  • * '>citation
  • foolhardy

    English

    Adjective

    (en-adj)
  • Marked by unthinking recklessness with disregard for danger; bold but rash; hotheaded
  • * {{quote-book
  • , year=1876 , author=Mark Twain , title=The Adventures of Tom Sawyer , chapter=6 citation , passage=The master’s pulse stood still, and he stared helplessly. The buzz of study ceased. The pupils wondered if this foolhardy boy had lost his mind.}}
  • * 2000 . Bill Bryson, In a Sunburned Country , p. 14:
  • In the middle distance several foolhardy souls in wet suits were surfing toward some foamy outbursts on the rocky headland...

    Synonyms

    * bold * foolish * rash * daring * reckless

    Derived terms

    * foolhardiness