What is the difference between fool and chook?

fool | chook |


As nouns the difference between fool and chook

is that fool is (pejorative) a person with poor judgment or little intelligence while chook is (australia|new zealand|slang) a hen; a cooked chicken; a chicken dressed for cooking.

As a verb fool

is to trick; to make a fool of someone.

fool

English

Noun

(en noun)
  • (pejorative) A person with poor judgment or little intelligence.
  • You were a fool to cross that busy road without looking.
    The village fool threw his own shoes down the well.
  • * Franklin
  • Experience keeps a dear school, but fools' will learn in no ' other .
  • (historical) A jester; a person whose role was to entertain a sovereign and the court (or lower personages).
  • (informal) Someone who derives pleasure from something specified.
  • * Milton
  • Can they think me their fool or jester?
  • * 1975 , , "Fool for the City" (song), Fool for the City (album):
  • I'm a fool for the city.
  • (cooking) A type of dessert made of d fruit and custard or cream.
  • an apricot fool'''; a gooseberry '''fool
  • A particular card in a tarot deck.
  • Synonyms

    * (person with poor judgment) See also * (person who entertained a sovereign) jester, joker * (person who talks a lot of nonsense) gobshite

    Verb

  • To trick; to make a fool of someone.
  • To play the fool; to trifle; to toy; to spend time in idle sport or mirth.
  • * Dryden
  • Is this a time for fooling ?

    Synonyms

    * See also

    Derived terms

    * befool * fool about * fool around * foolhardy * foolish * foolishness * foolometer * fool's errand * fool's gold * fool's paradise * foolproof * more fool you * play the fool * suffer fools gladly * there's no fool like an old fool

    References

    1000 English basic words ----

    chook

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • (Australia, New Zealand, slang) A hen; a cooked chicken; a chicken dressed for cooking.
  • * 2005 , , The Complete Burke?s Backyard: The Ultimate Book of Fact Sheets , page 683,
  • Worm chickens once every three months and, if an occasional lice problem occurs, spray the inside of the chook shed with Coopex.
  • * 2006', Judith Brett, ''The '''Chook in the Australian Unconscious'', in Peter Beilharz, Robert Manne, ''Reflected Light: La Trobe Essays , page 329,
  • This little book, with its meticulous pencil drawings of chooks' in mechanical contraptions and photos to show the machine in operation with a white leghorn called Gregory Peck, is evidence of both the sadism inspired by the ' chook ?s comparatively flightless fate and the laughter we use to defend ourselves against the knowledge of that sadism.
  • * 2011 , Helen Maczkowiackpeglerpegler, An Awkward Fit , page 21,
  • She decided to dig her way under the fence into their chook house and had great fun running around and biting the necks of about eight chooks' and leaving them half-dead and bleeding. The neighbour was furious, and unfortunately it was Dad?s birthday, so when he arrived home from work, Mum said ‘Happy birthday and(sic) darling. Guess what? Your dog has half-killed most of the neighbour?s ' chooks .’
  • (Australia, dated) A fool.
  • Derived terms

    * chook chaser * chookhouse * chook poop * chook raffle * chook wheel * chookyard