Fawn vs Foal - What's the difference?

fawn | foal |


As nouns the difference between fawn and foal

is that fawn is a young deer while foal is a young (male or female) horse, especially just after birth or less than a year old.

As verbs the difference between fawn and foal

is that fawn is to give birth to a fawn while foal is to give birth; to bear offspring.

As an adjective fawn

is of the fawn colour.

fawn

English

(wikipedia fawn)

Etymology 1

From (etyl) faon.

Noun

(en noun)
  • A young deer.
  • A pale brown colour tinted with yellow, like that of a fawn.
  • (obsolete) The young of an animal; a whelp.
  • * Holland
  • [The tigress] after her fawns .

    Adjective

    (-)
  • Of the fawn colour.
  • Derived terms
    * fawn lily

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To give birth to a fawn.
  • Etymology 2

    From (etyl) fawnen, from (etyl) fahnian, fagnian, . See also fain.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To exhibit affection or attempt to please.
  • To seek favour by flattery and obsequious behaviour (with on'' or ''upon ).
  • * Shakespeare
  • You showed your teeth like apes, and fawned like hounds.
  • * Milton
  • Thou with trembling fear, / Or like a fawning parasite, obeyest.
  • * Macaulay
  • courtiers who fawn on a master while they betray him
  • *
  • , title=The Mirror and the Lamp , chapter=2 citation , passage=That the young Mr. Churchills liked—but they did not like him coming round of an evening and drinking weak whisky-and-water while he held forth on railway debentures and corporation loans. Mr. Barrett, however, by fawning and flattery, seemed to be able to make not only Mrs. Churchill but everyone else do what he desired.}}
  • (of a dog) To wag its tail, to show devotion.
  • Synonyms
    * (seek favour by flattery) grovel, wheedle
    Derived terms
    * fawn over

    See also

    *

    References

    ----

    foal

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A young (male or female) horse, especially just after birth or less than a year old.
  • Verb

  • (equestrian) To give birth; to bear offspring.
  • * 1877 , (Anna Sewell), (Black Beauty) Chapter 22[http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Black_Beauty/22]
  • "Well," said John, "I don't believe there is a better pair of horses in the country, and right grieved I am to part with them, but they are not alike; the black one is the most perfect temper I ever knew; I suppose he has never known a hard word or a blow since he was foaled , and all his pleasure seems to be to do what you wish...

    See also

    * (l) * (l) * (l) * (l) * (l)

    Anagrams

    * (l), (l), (l)