Hoist vs Flush - What's the difference?

hoist | flush | Related terms |

Hoist is a related term of flush.


In lang=en terms the difference between hoist and flush

is that hoist is to be lifted up while flush is to excite, inflame.

As verbs the difference between hoist and flush

is that hoist is to raise; to lift; to elevate; especially, to raise or lift to a desired elevation, by means of tackle or pulley, as a sail, a flag, a heavy package or weight while flush is to cause to take flight from concealment or flush can be to cleanse by flooding with generous quantities of a fluid.

As nouns the difference between hoist and flush

is that hoist is a hoisting device, such as pulley or crane while flush is a group of birds that have suddenly started up from undergrowth, trees etc or flush can be a sudden flowing; a rush which fills or overflows, as of water for cleansing purposes or flush can be (poker) a hand consisting of all cards with the same suit.

As an adjective flush is

smooth, even, aligned; not sticking out.

hoist

English

Verb

  • To raise; to lift; to elevate; especially, to raise or lift to a desired elevation, by means of tackle or pulley, as a sail, a flag, a heavy package or weight.
  • * Alexander Pope
  • They land my goods, and hoist my flying sails.
  • * South
  • hoisting him into his father's throne
  • * 1719:
  • ...but this last was so heavy, I could not hoist it up to get it over the ship's side.
  • * 1883 , (Robert Louis Stevenson), (Treasure Island)
  • Between us, with much trouble, we managed to hoist him upstairs, and laid him on his bed, where his head fell back on the pillow, as if he were almost fainting.
  • * {{quote-news
  • , year=2011 , date=October 23 , author=Tom Fordyce , title=2011 Rugby World Cup final: New Zealand 8-7 France , work=BBC Sport citation , page= , passage=And when skipper Richie McCaw hoisted the Webb Ellis Trophy high into the night, a quarter of a century of hurt was blown away in an explosion of fireworks and cheering.}}
  • (historical) To lift someone up to be flogged.
  • To be lifted up.
  • (comptheory) To extract (code) from a loop construct as part of optimization.
  • Usage notes

    * "Hoisted" is about fifteen times more common than "hoist" in US usage as past and past participle. The "hoist" form is also uncommon in the UK except in the expression "hoist by one's own petard".

    Quotations

    * They land my goods, and hoist my flying sails . — * Hoisting him into his father’s throne . —

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A hoisting device, such as pulley or crane.
  • The act of hoisting; a lift.
  • Give me a hoist over that wall.
  • The perpendicular height of a flag, as opposed to the fly, or horizontal length, when flying from a staff.
  • The vertical edge of a flag which is next to the staff.
  • The height of a fore-and-aft sail, next the mast or stay.
  • flush

    English

    (wikipedia flush)

    Etymology 1

    (etyl)

    Noun

    (es)
  • A group of birds that have suddenly started up from undergrowth, trees etc.
  • * 1596 , (Edmund Spenser), The Faerie Queene , V.2:
  • As when a Faulcon hath with nimble flight / Flowne at a flush of Ducks foreby the brooke […].

    Verb

    (es)
  • To cause to take flight from concealment.
  • The hunters flushed the tiger from the canebrake.
  • To take suddenly to flight, especially from cover.
  • A covey of quail flushed from the undergrowth.
  • * W. Browne
  • flushing from one spray unto another

    Etymology 2

    Same as according to the American Heritage Dictionary

    Adjective

    (er)
  • smooth, even, aligned; not sticking out.
  • Sand down the excess until it is flush with the surface.
  • wealthy or well off.
  • He just got a bonus so he's flush today.
  • (typography) Short for flush left and right ; a body of text aligned with both its left and right margins.
  • Full of vigour; fresh; glowing; bright.
  • * Shakespeare
  • With all his crimes broad blown, as flush as May.
  • Affluent; abounding; well furnished or suppled; hence, liberal; prodigal.
  • * Arbuthnot
  • Lord Strut was not very flush in ready.
    Synonyms
    * (typography) double-clean, flush left and right, forced, forced justified, force justified, justified
    Derived terms
    * flush left, flush right, flush left and right

    Etymology 3

    Probably from according to American Heritage Dictionary

    Noun

    (es)
  • A sudden flowing; a rush which fills or overflows, as of water for cleansing purposes.
  • * Ray
  • in manner of a wave or flush
  • Particularly, such a cleansing of a toilet.
  • A suffusion of the face with blood, as from fear, shame, modesty, or intensity of feeling of any kind; a blush; a glow.
  • * Tennyson
  • the flush of angered shame
  • Any tinge of red colour like that produced on the cheeks by a sudden rush of blood.
  • the flush''' on the side of a peach; the '''flush on the clouds at sunset
  • A sudden flood or rush of feeling; a thrill of excitement, animation, etc.
  • a flush of joy

    Verb

    (es)
  • To cleanse by flooding with generous quantities of a fluid.
  • Flush the injury with plenty of water.
  • Particularly, to cleanse a toilet by introducing a large amount of water.
  • To become suffused with reddish color due to embarrassment, excitement, overheating, or other systemic disturbance, to blush.
  • The damsel flushed at the scoundrel's suggestion.
  • To cause to blush.
  • * John Gay
  • Nor flush with shame the passing virgin's cheek.
  • * Keats
  • Sudden a thought came like a full-blown rose, / Flushing his brow.
  • * 1925 , Fruit of the Flower , by
  • "Who plants a seed begets a bud, -- Extract of that same root; -- Why marvel at the hectic blood -- That flushes this wild fruit?"
  • To cause to be full; to flood; to overflow; to overwhelm with water.
  • to flush the meadows
  • To excite, inflame.
  • * South
  • such things as can only feed his pride and flush his ambition
  • (of a toilet) To be cleansed by being flooded with generous quantities of water.
  • There must be somebody home: I just heard the toilet flushing .
  • (computing) To clear (a buffer) of its contents.
  • To flow and spread suddenly; to rush.
  • Blood flushes into the face.
  • * Boyle
  • the flushing noise of many waters
  • To show red; to shine suddenly; to glow.
  • * Milton
  • In her cheek, distemper flushing glowed.
  • (masonry) To fill in (joints); to point the level; to make them flush.
  • Usage notes
    In sense “turn red with embarrassment”, (blush) is more common. More finely, in indicating the actual change, blush'' is more common – “He blushed with embarrassment” – but in indicating state, ''flushed is also common – “He was flushed with excitement”.
    Synonyms
    * (turn red with embarrassment) blush

    Etymology 4

    Probably from (etyl) , cognate with flux

    Noun

    (es)
  • (poker) A hand consisting of all cards with the same suit.
  • Derived terms
    * busted flush * royal flush * straight flush