Flecked vs Flocked - What's the difference?

flecked | flocked |


As verbs the difference between flecked and flocked

is that flecked is (fleck) while flocked is (flock).

Other Comparisons: What's the difference?

flecked

English

Verb

(head)
  • (fleck)

  • fleck

    English

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A flake
  • A lock, as of wool.
  • A small spot or streak; a speckle.
  • * Longfellow
  • A sunny fleck .
  • * Tennyson
  • Life is dashed with flecks of sin.

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To mark with small spots
  • *
  • *:So this was my future home, I thought!Backed by towering hills, the but faintly discernible purple line of the French boundary off to the southwest, a sky of palest Gobelin flecked with fat, fleecy little clouds, it in truth looked a dear little city; the city of one's dreams.
  • flocked

    English

    Verb

    (head)
  • (flock)

  • flock

    English

    Etymology 1

    From (etyl) . More at (l).

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • A large number of birds, especially those gathered together for the purpose of migration.
  • A large number of animals, especially sheep or goats kept together.
  • Those served by a particular pastor or shepherd.
  • * {{quote-book
  • , year=1995 , author=Green Key Books , title=God's Word to the Nations (John 10:16) citation , passage=I also have other sheep that are not from this pen. I must lead them. They, too, will respond to my voice. So they will be one flock with one shepherd. }}
  • * Tennyson
  • As half amazed, half frighted all his flock .
  • A large number of people.
  • * Bible, 2 Macc. xiv. 14
  • The heathen came to Nicanor by flocks .
    Synonyms
    * congregation, bunch, gaggle, horde, host, legion, litter, nest, rabble, swarm, throng, wake

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To congregate in or head towards a place in large numbers.
  • People flocked to the cinema to see the new film.
  • * Dryden
  • Friends daily flock .
  • (obsolete) To flock to; to crowd.
  • * 1609 , Taylor
  • Good fellows, trooping, flocked me so.
  • To treat a pool with chemicals to remove suspended particles.
  • Etymology 2

    From (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Coarse tufts of wool or cotton used in bedding
  • A lock of wool or hair.
  • *(William Shakespeare) (c.1564–1616)
  • *:I prythee, Tom, beat Cut's saddle, put a few flocks in the point [pommel].
  • Very fine sifted woollen refuse, especially that from shearing the nap of cloths, formerly used as a coating for wallpaper to give it a velvety or clothlike appearance; also, the dust of vegetable fibre used for a similar purpose.
  • *
  • *:There was a neat hat-and-umbrella stand, and the stranger's weary feet fell soft on a good, serviceable dark-red drugget, which matched in colour the flock -paper on the walls.
  • Verb

    (en verb)
  • To coat a surface with dense fibers or particles.