Flock vs Muckle - What's the difference?

flock | muckle |


As nouns the difference between flock and muckle

is that flock is a large number of birds, especially those gathered together for the purpose of migration or flock can be coarse tufts of wool or cotton used in bedding while muckle is (chiefly|scotland) a great amount.

As verbs the difference between flock and muckle

is that flock is to congregate in or head towards a place in large numbers or flock can be to coat a surface with dense fibers or particles while muckle is (us|dialectal) to latch onto something with the mouth.

As an adjective muckle is

(archaic|outside|northumbria|and|scotland) large, massive.

flock

English

Etymology 1

From (etyl) . More at (l).

Noun

(en noun)
  • A large number of birds, especially those gathered together for the purpose of migration.
  • A large number of animals, especially sheep or goats kept together.
  • Those served by a particular pastor or shepherd.
  • * {{quote-book
  • , year=1995 , author=Green Key Books , title=God's Word to the Nations (John 10:16) citation , passage=I also have other sheep that are not from this pen. I must lead them. They, too, will respond to my voice. So they will be one flock with one shepherd. }}
  • * Tennyson
  • As half amazed, half frighted all his flock .
  • A large number of people.
  • * Bible, 2 Macc. xiv. 14
  • The heathen came to Nicanor by flocks .
    Synonyms
    * congregation, bunch, gaggle, horde, host, legion, litter, nest, rabble, swarm, throng, wake

    Verb

    (en verb)
  • To congregate in or head towards a place in large numbers.
  • People flocked to the cinema to see the new film.
  • * Dryden
  • Friends daily flock .
  • (obsolete) To flock to; to crowd.
  • * 1609 , Taylor
  • Good fellows, trooping, flocked me so.
  • To treat a pool with chemicals to remove suspended particles.
  • Etymology 2

    From (etyl) .

    Noun

    (en noun)
  • Coarse tufts of wool or cotton used in bedding
  • A lock of wool or hair.
  • *(William Shakespeare) (c.1564–1616)
  • *:I prythee, Tom, beat Cut's saddle, put a few flocks in the point [pommel].
  • Very fine sifted woollen refuse, especially that from shearing the nap of cloths, formerly used as a coating for wallpaper to give it a velvety or clothlike appearance; also, the dust of vegetable fibre used for a similar purpose.
  • *
  • *:There was a neat hat-and-umbrella stand, and the stranger's weary feet fell soft on a good, serviceable dark-red drugget, which matched in colour the flock -paper on the walls.
  • Verb

    (en verb)
  • To coat a surface with dense fibers or particles.
  • muckle

    English

    Noun

    (-)
  • (chiefly, Scotland) A great amount.
  • Derived terms

    * many a mickle makes a muckle

    Adjective

    (en adjective)
  • (archaic, outside, Northumbria, and, Scotland) Large, massive.
  • * , song A Pair o Nicky-tams :
  • She clorts a muckle piece [sandwich] tae me, wi' different kinds o' jam,
    An' tells me ilka nicht that she admires my Nicky Tams.
  • (archaic, outside, Northumbria, and, Scotland) Much.
  • Verb

    (muckl)
  • (US, dialectal) To latch onto something with the mouth.
  • * {{quote-book, 1954, Elizabeth Ogilvie, The Dawning of the Day citation
  • , passage= And how'd she get such a holt on you, Terence Campion, let alone the way she's muckled onto those Bennetts?}}
  • * {{quote-book, 2002, William G. Wilkoff, The Maternity Leave Breastfeeding Plan, isbn=0743213459 citation
  • , passage=Another technique for the baby who is having trouble muckling on involves a breast or nipple shield.}}
  • * {{quote-book, 2004, William J. Vande Kopple, The Catch: Families, Fishing, and Faith, page=18, isbn=0802826776 citation
  • , passage=When an exhausted sucker is hauled to the top of The Wall, usually its muckling circle of a mouth goes into a frenzied sucking spasm.}}
  • (rare) To talk big; to exaggerate.
  • * {{quote-book, 1896, , The Complete Plays of Gilbert and Sullivan, year_published=1941
  • , passage=I told him all, / Both bad and good; / I bade him call — / He said he would: / I added much — the more I muckled , / The more that chuckling chummy chuckled! }}

    Synonyms

    * (to talk big) mickle

    References

    * * * Geordie English